Boing Boing http://www.9488038.com Brain candy for Happy Mutants Mon, 18 Mar 2019 20:23:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.1.1 https://i0.wp.com/www.9488038.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/apple-touch-icon-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Boing Boing http://www.9488038.com 32 32 87954168 Sloth very clear on importance of chewing food slowly http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/sloth-very-clear-on-importance.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/sloth-very-clear-on-importance.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 20:23:16 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706489 “Tell tha chef it's excellent.”

Definitely thought this was just a looped clip, but hold on. Nope.

This slow eating sloth is very serious about eating slowly.

Tell tha chef it's excellent

[via]

Read the rest “Sloth very clear on importance of chewing food slowly”

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“Tell tha chef it's excellent.”

Definitely thought this was just a looped clip, but hold on. Nope.

This slow eating sloth is very serious about eating slowly.

Tell tha chef it's excellent

[via]

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This 'Belle' cosplay is some pretty impressive Disney princess-ness http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/this-belle-cosplay-is-some.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/this-belle-cosplay-is-some.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 20:16:40 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706482 Seriously impressive Disney Princess fabulousness from cosplayer thesarcasticginger, who totally pulls off this Belle.

Amazing!

Also some adorable photos of her cat friend, fidget.

Here's the whole series, below.

You guys asked for more pictures of me as Belle, and I'm delivering. Also cat tax at the end.

[via] Read the rest “This 'Belle' cosplay is some pretty impressive Disney princess-ness”

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Seriously impressive Disney Princess fabulousness from cosplayer thesarcasticginger, who totally pulls off this Belle.

Amazing!

Also some adorable photos of her cat friend, fidget.

Here's the whole series, below.

You guys asked for more pictures of me as Belle, and I'm delivering. Also cat tax at the end.

[via]

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God of Hammers cosplay with LED eyes (don't try this!) http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/god-of-hammers-cosplay-with-le.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/god-of-hammers-cosplay-with-le.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 20:08:35 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706476 If you were at the Emerald City Comic-Con this weekend in Seattle, you may have seen this amazing cosplay in person.

Lucky you.

Holy crap, this is some serious dedication or bonkers-ness. Maybe both. The result is beautiful but good heavens, you could totally go blind doing this.

From IMGURian MissBoof, the woman who pulled it off and did not go blind, explains how she did it below.

She says:

I've had a lot of people asking about the eye effect:

1. Talk to your optometrist before doing this

2. My leds are long wave 405 nm 30 degree blacklight mini leds. These are the least intense/ invasive I found and I was able to ensure they could skim the contact lens.

3. The contact lens are special lens that react to blacklight

4. ADD A POTENTIOMETER. This allows you to dim the lights, otherwise you will walk into a garbage can in a dark room (was super embarrassing). since adding the dimmer this cosplay is now bar friendly and drunk people love this shit! I can see in normal lighting and such without any issues at all, I usually can't even tell when the lights are on.

5. Have fuuuuuuuun!

God of Hammers

Video by hobbit2153.

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Los Angeles! I'm launching my new book Radicalized with Lexi Alexander tonight (next: San Diego, NYC, Toronto...) http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/the-grove-7pm.html Mon, 18 Mar 2019 19:23:19 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706469 Tonight is the launch for my latest book of science fiction for adults, Radicalized: I'll be at the Barnes and Novel at The Grove in Los Angeles, in conversation with director/activist/stuntwoman/champion kickboxer Lexi Alexander, starting at 7PM.

From there, the tour takes me to San Diego tomorrow (Mysterious Galaxy, 7:30 PM; then NYC on Wednesday (The Strand, 7PM, with Anand Giridharadas); then Toronto on Thursday (Metro Reference Library, 7PM, with Barry Hertz), and then I'm in Chicago, San Francisco, Fort Vancouver, WA (Portland, essentially!), and Seattle.

I hope to see you! Read the rest “Los Angeles! I'm launching my new book Radicalized with Lexi Alexander tonight (next: San Diego, NYC, Toronto...)”

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Tonight is the launch for my latest book of science fiction for adults, Radicalized: I'll be at the Barnes and Novel at The Grove in Los Angeles, in conversation with director/activist/stuntwoman/champion kickboxer Lexi Alexander, starting at 7PM.

From there, the tour takes me to San Diego tomorrow (Mysterious Galaxy, 7:30 PM; then NYC on Wednesday (The Strand, 7PM, with Anand Giridharadas); then Toronto on Thursday (Metro Reference Library, 7PM, with Barry Hertz), and then I'm in Chicago, San Francisco, Fort Vancouver, WA (Portland, essentially!), and Seattle.

I hope to see you! ]]> 706469 Believing in "meritocracy" makes you act like a dick http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/poes-law-for-oligarchs.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/poes-law-for-oligarchs.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 19:13:26 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706458 The term "meritocracy" was popularized in the UK sociologist Michael Young's 1958 novel, "The Rise of the Meritocracy," in which aristocrats insist that they are the natural rulers of their society based on "objective" measures of worth ("merit" + "aristocracy" = "meritocracy") that are obviously tilted to favor them, a fact that they are conveniently blind to.

But satire has a way of being overtaken by doctrine, and today, a majority of Americans believe that they live in a meritocracy where the market elevates the worthy to positions of wealth and privilege (and power!) despite widespread evidence that the rich cheat. Even as inequality has worsened, the 9.9% have only become more convinced that merit is the factor that determines success, freaking out when you point out the role that luck paid in their elevation, and despite the extensive literature showing that meritocracies become oligarchies in short order.

Today, the belief in "meritocracy" has become a hallmark of violent, right-wing harassment and terror movements, whose doctrinal conviction that they live in a meritocracy is also a convenient reason to deny calls for inclusiveness ("If women are so smart, how come they're paid less than men?!").

The meritocratic delusion finally seems to be in decline. Behavior economists are producing reams of research showing that people who believe in meritocracy make decisions that harm them, while management scholars are producing research that shows that "meritocratic" evaluation criteria causes managers to downrank women who fare as well as men when the idea of meritocracy is taken off the table. Read the rest “Believing in "meritocracy" makes you act like a dick”

]]> The term "meritocracy" was popularized in the UK sociologist Michael Young's 1958 novel, "The Rise of the Meritocracy," in which aristocrats insist that they are the natural rulers of their society based on "objective" measures of worth ("merit" + "aristocracy" = "meritocracy") that are obviously tilted to favor them, a fact that they are conveniently blind to.

But satire has a way of being overtaken by doctrine, and today, a majority of Americans believe that they live in a meritocracy where the market elevates the worthy to positions of wealth and privilege (and power!) despite widespread evidence that the rich cheat. Even as inequality has worsened, the 9.9% have only become more convinced that merit is the factor that determines success, freaking out when you point out the role that luck paid in their elevation, and despite the extensive literature showing that meritocracies become oligarchies in short order.

Today, the belief in "meritocracy" has become a hallmark of violent, right-wing harassment and terror movements, whose doctrinal conviction that they live in a meritocracy is also a convenient reason to deny calls for inclusiveness ("If women are so smart, how come they're paid less than men?!").

The meritocratic delusion finally seems to be in decline. Behavior economists are producing reams of research showing that people who believe in meritocracy make decisions that harm them, while management scholars are producing research that shows that "meritocratic" evaluation criteria causes managers to downrank women who fare as well as men when the idea of meritocracy is taken off the table.

Of course, meritocracy is a delusion with an extremely profitable business model. A widespread belief in meritocracy saves the super-rich untold sums in guard-labor to prevent mobs from building guillotines in their circular driveways. So long as the oligarch class continues to promote the circular logic of meritocracy -- "The best people find their way to the top, and I should know, I'm the best person I know and I'm on top. How do I know I'm the best? Well, I'm on top, aren't I?" -- its final days will be forestalled.

Perhaps more disturbing, simply holding meritocracy as a value seems to promote discriminatory behavior. The management scholar Emilio Castilla at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the sociologist Stephen Benard at Indiana University studied attempts to implement meritocratic practices, such as performance-based compensation in private companies. They found that, in companies that explicitly held meritocracy as a core value, managers assigned greater rewards to male employees over female employees with identical performance evaluations. This preference disappeared where meritocracy was not explicitly adopted as a value.

This is surprising because impartiality is the core of meritocracy’s moral appeal. The “even playing field” is intended to avoid unfair inequalities based on gender, race, and the like. Yet Castilla and Benard found that, ironically, attempts to implement meritocracy leads to just the kinds of inequalities that it aims to eliminate. They suggest that this “paradox of meritocracy” occurs because explicitly adopting meritocracy as a value convinces subjects of their own moral bona fides. Satisfied that they are just, they become less inclined to examine their own behavior for signs of prejudice.

Meritocracy doesn’t exist, and believing it does is bad for you [Clifton Mark/Fast Company]

(via Four Short Links) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/poes-law-for-oligarchs.html/feed 61 706458 Drunken gentleman on a high-speed train threatens the engineer with a fire extinguisher for speeding http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/drunken-gentleman-on-a-high-sp.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/drunken-gentleman-on-a-high-sp.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:56:11 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706447 A sloshed gentleman thought the high-speed train he was traveling on was moving too fast and became aggressive, grabbing a fire extinguisher and smashing a window in hopes of saving the day.

According to USA Today:

Police say passengers said the man took a fire extinguisher off the wall, smashed a glass door separating the cab from the passenger compartment, and told the shocked driver the train was going much too fast and he had to save the passengers.

And:

Federal police said the ICE train operated by Germany's Deutsche Bahn stopped near Frankfurt after the incident Sunday morning. The 30-year-old man from Heideberg, who wasn't identified, was arrested and faces an investigation into dangerous interference in rail traffic, among other things.

Fortunately, his heroic act did not injure any passengers.

Image: Max Pixel Read the rest “Drunken gentleman on a high-speed train threatens the engineer with a fire extinguisher for speeding”

]]> A sloshed gentleman thought the high-speed train he was traveling on was moving too fast and became aggressive, grabbing a fire extinguisher and smashing a window in hopes of saving the day.

According to USA Today:

Police say passengers said the man took a fire extinguisher off the wall, smashed a glass door separating the cab from the passenger compartment, and told the shocked driver the train was going much too fast and he had to save the passengers.

And:

Federal police said the ICE train operated by Germany's Deutsche Bahn stopped near Frankfurt after the incident Sunday morning. The 30-year-old man from Heideberg, who wasn't identified, was arrested and faces an investigation into dangerous interference in rail traffic, among other things.

Fortunately, his heroic act did not injure any passengers.

Image: Max Pixel

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What's wrong with blaming "information" for political chaos http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/oligarchs-r-us-3.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/oligarchs-r-us-3.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:48:59 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706455 David Perell's 13,000 word essay, "What the Hell is Going On?" presents a reassuring -- and contrarian -- view on how our current dysfunction in politics, media, and business has come to pass, drawing on orthodox economic theories about "information asymmetry" in a way that makes the whole thing seem like a kind of adjustment period between a middling old world and a fine new one.

I think Perell is wrong. His theory omits the most salient, obvious explanation for what's going on (the creation of an oligarchy that has diminished the efficacy of public institutions and introduced widespread corruption in every domain), in favor of rationalizations that let the wealthy and their enablers off the hook, converting a corrupt system with nameable human actors who have benefited from it and who spend lavishly to perpetuate it into a systemic problem that emerges from a historical moment in which everyone is blameless, prisoners of fate and history.

Perell's theory goes a little like this: once we had incomplete information and so we had to rely on rules of thumb to navigate the world. We trusted brands because we couldn't access realtime customer reviews to tell us whether a product was any good. We trusted universities because we couldn't access libraries and communities that let us train ourselves. We trusted political parties because the news media pushed a narrative that made it hard to find out when the parties were corrupt or ineffectual.

All of this is true, as is Perell's conclusion. Read the rest “What's wrong with blaming "information" for political chaos”

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David Perell's 13,000 word essay, "What the Hell is Going On?" presents a reassuring -- and contrarian -- view on how our current dysfunction in politics, media, and business has come to pass, drawing on orthodox economic theories about "information asymmetry" in a way that makes the whole thing seem like a kind of adjustment period between a middling old world and a fine new one.

I think Perell is wrong. His theory omits the most salient, obvious explanation for what's going on (the creation of an oligarchy that has diminished the efficacy of public institutions and introduced widespread corruption in every domain), in favor of rationalizations that let the wealthy and their enablers off the hook, converting a corrupt system with nameable human actors who have benefited from it and who spend lavishly to perpetuate it into a systemic problem that emerges from a historical moment in which everyone is blameless, prisoners of fate and history.

Perell's theory goes a little like this: once we had incomplete information and so we had to rely on rules of thumb to navigate the world. We trusted brands because we couldn't access realtime customer reviews to tell us whether a product was any good. We trusted universities because we couldn't access libraries and communities that let us train ourselves. We trusted political parties because the news media pushed a narrative that made it hard to find out when the parties were corrupt or ineffectual.

All of this is true, as is Perell's conclusion. The internet produced better access to information, which has made everything decohere. We can choose to buy craft beer instead of beer from the giant conglomerates and the net helps us figure out which beer will be good. We can teach ourselves without accruing massive debts. We can shop for news sources that tailor to our interests and step outside the overton window.

But that's as far as he goes, and that's where he goes wrong. Because inequality and the internet grew up together (Ronald Reagan was elected the year the Apple ][+ hit the market), and any account of the past 40 years has to examine both together.

The French economist Thomas Piketty presents a compelling case that in the late 1970s, global wealth concentration reached a tipping point thanks to the slow but inevitable recovery of fortunes lost in the World Wars; at that moment, the richest people in the world finally had amassed enough capital to start spending in earnest to buy political outcomes that would make them even richer.

40 years later, we live in a world of rampant monopolization, a political consensus totally at odds with popular views, and an epistemological crisis born of the combination of the deliberate sowing of doubt over scientific consensuses ("some experts don't believe in vaccines"), captured regulators ("of course FDA says vaccines are safe, they're in the pocket of big pharma") and decades of abuse from concentrated industries whose size and wealth confer immunity to consequences for bad actions ("why should we trust pharma after all the bad shit they've done?").

Add to this the precarity of a disappearing middle class and the end of upward social mobility, and many of Perell's outcomes can be explained or recast without making it all about increased access to information.

For example, people take on crushing debts to send their kids to university because social mobility has all but ended and they worry that without a degree, their kids will slide down the economic ladder. The universities build massive stadiums and other fripperies to lure in the super-rich whose overt and covert bribery are the source of personal wealth for the swelling ranks of high-paid administrators. They don't pay faculty enough to live on because desperate poor people have taken on so much debt to send so many poor kids to university that they have a buyer's market for adjuncts.

Political "polarization" is not the result of increased information, rather, it is a mirage brought on by the fact that the vast majority of people favor policies that politicians refuse to deliver; any politician who tries is branded as an out-of-touch radical, while the "serious grownups" continue to insist that America (alone among the world's developed states) can't afford universal health care, decent public education, net neutrality, etc.

Politicians like Trump can mobilize huge amounts of votes by welding together a coalition of the super-rich (who want tax cuts and don't care about anything else), racists, and people who are genuinely disaffected and worried about downward mobility by saying (truthfully) that "the system is rigged" (while omitting the fact that it was rigged in his favor and he intends to rig it further in office).

And while "micro brands" are on the rise, a shocking number of them are owned by the same handful of companies (whose shares, in turn, are largely owned by the same minuscule class of investors and handful of giant funds). Thanks to lax antitrust enforcement, this is not an age in which the rentiers are being euthanized: it's one in which the rentiers have bought up every conceivable place you might shop, leaving you with no possible way to avoid enriching them.

The internet has foundationally altered our information asymmetries, but it will not cause inequality and the corruption that creates it to wither away. Any critique of political and economic chaos that fails to take account of corruption and fails to place the blame on those who have benefited from it is worse than incomplete: it's a dangerous counsel of complacency.

Micro brands are on the rise. They’re attacking mascara, mattresses, and everything in between. They have low overhead costs, elegant design, and hyper-efficient customer acquisition strategies.

And yet, due to the fragmentation of the internet, they’re nearly invisible in the real world. Even if you’re one of millions of people looking at the same brand’s website, you’ll never know it. For that reason, we underestimate the potency of internet trends, such as the rise of micro brands. Their collective command over attention and consumer dollars is soaring up and to the right. Their advertising executives prefer efficient, micro-targeted, easy-to-measure advertisements over the entertaining, mass-appeal, hard-to-measure campaigns the world’s largest advertising agencies specialize in.

By creating unlimited shelf space and reducing information asymmetries, power in the internet age is shifting from suppliers to customers. The world is increasingly demand driven. Customers have more choices than ever before. They can buy anything, at any time. Through the internet, brands can serve a long-tail of unmet consumer needs, which weren’t served by big box retailers. Small direct-to-consumer brands are popping up left and right. Their products go beyond their utilitarian purposes and reflect the identities of people who buy them. From dairy-free yogurt, to anti-razor bump grooming products, to the assortment of milks (oat, almond, skim, soy, coconut, rice, hemp, plant, cashew, macadamia, hazelnut, pea, flax, peanut, walnut) so large that you need a rolodex to keep track of them all, the products themselves differentiate these upstart brands from incumbents.

13,000 word essay, "What the Hell is Going On?" [David Perell]

(via Four Short Links) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/oligarchs-r-us-3.html/feed 7 706455 LA Magazine wrote an entire article on how cool Souplantation is http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/la-magazine-wrote-an-entire-ar.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/la-magazine-wrote-an-entire-ar.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:43:27 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706449 I do remember eating at Souplantation when I lived in LA. Buffets were soul-less and scary unless they were at an Indian food restaurant where they became pretty hilarious. All you can eat and drink sushi was awesome.

LA Magazine sure makes Souplantation sound like a buffet-style restaurant to me.

LA Magazine:

Since its founding by a surfer in 1978, Souplantation has survived bankruptcy, an e-coli outbreak, and food-stealing customers. The restaurant is treated like a punchline on social media, but certain locations—like the one at Beverly Connection which, until recently, featured a quote from Fran Lebowitz on its walls—seem to be thriving.

“It doesn’t have a bleak Sizzler vibe,” says Bethany Cosentino, one-half of the band Best Coast. “It’s its own mood and its own thing, and the pure joy it brings me can never ever be replaced by any other salad bar—not even the Whole Foods one.”

Some still can’t get over the name. Search Twitter for “Souplantation” and the results are a mix of pop culture GIFs and bafflement that a restaurant in 2019 would want to associate boiling liquids and broccoli dishes with the history of slavery. (Throughout most of the country, the chain is called Sweet Tomatoes.)

The Smorgasbord at the Magic Castle was one of the scariest things I've ever seen. Read the rest “LA Magazine wrote an entire article on how cool Souplantation is”

]]> I do remember eating at Souplantation when I lived in LA. Buffets were soul-less and scary unless they were at an Indian food restaurant where they became pretty hilarious. All you can eat and drink sushi was awesome.

LA Magazine sure makes Souplantation sound like a buffet-style restaurant to me.

LA Magazine:

Since its founding by a surfer in 1978, Souplantation has survived bankruptcy, an e-coli outbreak, and food-stealing customers. The restaurant is treated like a punchline on social media, but certain locations—like the one at Beverly Connection which, until recently, featured a quote from Fran Lebowitz on its walls—seem to be thriving.

“It doesn’t have a bleak Sizzler vibe,” says Bethany Cosentino, one-half of the band Best Coast. “It’s its own mood and its own thing, and the pure joy it brings me can never ever be replaced by any other salad bar—not even the Whole Foods one.”

Some still can’t get over the name. Search Twitter for “Souplantation” and the results are a mix of pop culture GIFs and bafflement that a restaurant in 2019 would want to associate boiling liquids and broccoli dishes with the history of slavery. (Throughout most of the country, the chain is called Sweet Tomatoes.)

The Smorgasbord at the Magic Castle was one of the scariest things I've ever seen.

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Good deal on USB C portable charger that can charge a MacBook and a Switch http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/good-deal-on-usb-c-portable-ch.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/good-deal-on-usb-c-portable-ch.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:39:50 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706446 I got one of these RAVPower portable chargers for my nephew a couple of years ago, and he told me it was great to use with his Nintendo Switch, because he could play the Switch with the charger connected and the battery charge would increase at the same time. This newer version is available at a discount when you use the promo code LKWZQ4C3. Read the rest “Good deal on USB C portable charger that can charge a MacBook and a Switch”

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I got one of these RAVPower portable chargers for my nephew a couple of years ago, and he told me it was great to use with his Nintendo Switch, because he could play the Switch with the charger connected and the battery charge would increase at the same time. This newer version is available at a discount when you use the promo code LKWZQ4C3.

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John Oliver looks at public shaming on the internet http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/john-oliver-looks-at-public-sh.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/john-oliver-looks-at-public-sh.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:29:59 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706437

John Oliver shows how innocent people's lives can be destroyed by unwarranted public shaming. As an example, he gives the example of the woman who "sued her nephew" for injuring her by hugging her too hard.? The real story is more complicated - the woman was forced to sue her nephew to get the insurance company to pay her bills (and her nephew and her parents were happy about it). As a result of the public shaming online, no one would hire her, and she had to change her identity.

 

He also interviewed Monica Lewinsky about her thoughts on public shaming, having been a victim of it for years. Read the rest “John Oliver looks at public shaming on the internet”

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John Oliver shows how innocent people's lives can be destroyed by unwarranted public shaming. As an example, he gives the example of the woman who "sued her nephew" for injuring her by hugging her too hard.? The real story is more complicated - the woman was forced to sue her nephew to get the insurance company to pay her bills (and her nephew and her parents were happy about it). As a result of the public shaming online, no one would hire her, and she had to change her identity.

 

He also interviewed Monica Lewinsky about her thoughts on public shaming, having been a victim of it for years.

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SGeek goes nuts for Audeze Mobius headphones http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/sgeek-goes-nuts-for-audeze-mob.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/sgeek-goes-nuts-for-audeze-mob.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:12:23 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706420

I recently received a pair of Audeze Mobius to review and I have to agree with Lisabel's "HOLY SHIT!"

I am too new with these cans to give them a thorough review but my initial impression is that Audeze has figured out how to make their incredible planar magnetic headphone technology accessible to folks for an all-in price of around $400.

Typically, if you dive into the world of high-end audiophile headphones you are going to need a DAC and a specialized headphone amplifier in addition to cans. There is a lot of dickery about which headphones and what components sound best to whomever the hell is writing in an internet forum at this exact moment in time.

The Audeze Mobius have all the hardware built-in to the set of headphones!

You do not need to spend 1-2x more on components than you already did on headphones. You can take the Mobius out of the box, connect them via USB, Bluetooth or a 3.5mm jack to almost any source. You absolutely everything you need and can skip there "where is that one magic cable?" experience after spending $1000s on gear you can not connect.

While billed as "Gaming" headphones the Mobius are really much, much more than that. I am looking forward to a call with Audeze CEO Sankar Thiagasamudram sometime this week to start really diving into the functionality of the headset.

I was blown away with them in video games. Watching TV and movies are a whole new world where the audio is really evocative of a well-designed movie theater. Read the rest “SGeek goes nuts for Audeze Mobius headphones”

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I recently received a pair of Audeze Mobius to review and I have to agree with Lisabel's "HOLY SHIT!"

I am too new with these cans to give them a thorough review but my initial impression is that Audeze has figured out how to make their incredible planar magnetic headphone technology accessible to folks for an all-in price of around $400.

Typically, if you dive into the world of high-end audiophile headphones you are going to need a DAC and a specialized headphone amplifier in addition to cans. There is a lot of dickery about which headphones and what components sound best to whomever the hell is writing in an internet forum at this exact moment in time.

The Audeze Mobius have all the hardware built-in to the set of headphones!

You do not need to spend 1-2x more on components than you already did on headphones. You can take the Mobius out of the box, connect them via USB, Bluetooth or a 3.5mm jack to almost any source. You absolutely everything you need and can skip there "where is that one magic cable?" experience after spending $1000s on gear you can not connect.

While billed as "Gaming" headphones the Mobius are really much, much more than that. I am looking forward to a call with Audeze CEO Sankar Thiagasamudram sometime this week to start really diving into the functionality of the headset.

I was blown away with them in video games. Watching TV and movies are a whole new world where the audio is really evocative of a well-designed movie theater.

Can't wait to play with them more.

Audeze Mobius Premium 3D Gaming Headset via Amazon

Publisher's Note: I consulted for Audeze, under a prior CEO, for a few months, seven or eight years ago. I have had no contact with the company since and am reviewing the headphones because I am super enthusiastic about the technology.

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NYT reviews Citizen, a live map of crimes in your city http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/nyt-reviews-citizen-a-live-ma.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/nyt-reviews-citizen-a-live-ma.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 18:04:42 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706422 After reading this NY Times review of Citizen, which seems to be a Next Door on steroids,? I downloaded the app to see what's happening in the part of LA I live in:

FLAMING TRASH TRUCK ROLLED DOWN STREET

MAN VANDALIZING MARKET, THREATENING STAFF

PERSON CHOKED BY ARMED ATTACKER

WOMAN THROWING METAL INTO THE STREET

INDECENT EXPOSURE IN BACKYARD

It looks like I'm living in the movie, Children of Men.

From the review:

It is not clear, at first, where Citizen’s reports come from or how they’re selected. But they arrive constantly, in an authoritative voice, providing the app’s signature ambient sense of alarm and disorder.

Under the hood, Citizen is essentially a transcription service for emergency radio. The company employs teams of people to listen to police, fire and emergency radio transmissions and to submit certain categories of incident for including in the app. (“Citizen has a detailed editorial guide about what goes into the app and why,” Mr. Donald said. “Citizen does not include, for example, suicides inside a private residence, suspicious people, or vague suspect descriptions.”)

Read the rest “NYT reviews Citizen, a live map of crimes in your city”]]>
After reading this NY Times review of Citizen, which seems to be a Next Door on steroids,? I downloaded the app to see what's happening in the part of LA I live in:

FLAMING TRASH TRUCK ROLLED DOWN STREET

MAN VANDALIZING MARKET, THREATENING STAFF

PERSON CHOKED BY ARMED ATTACKER

WOMAN THROWING METAL INTO THE STREET

INDECENT EXPOSURE IN BACKYARD

It looks like I'm living in the movie, Children of Men.

From the review:

It is not clear, at first, where Citizen’s reports come from or how they’re selected. But they arrive constantly, in an authoritative voice, providing the app’s signature ambient sense of alarm and disorder.

Under the hood, Citizen is essentially a transcription service for emergency radio. The company employs teams of people to listen to police, fire and emergency radio transmissions and to submit certain categories of incident for including in the app. (“Citizen has a detailed editorial guide about what goes into the app and why,” Mr. Donald said. “Citizen does not include, for example, suicides inside a private residence, suspicious people, or vague suspect descriptions.”)

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Facebook's year-old "improvements" to the newsfeed have elevated enraging Fox News posts to the service's dominant form http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/anger-sells.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/anger-sells.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:59:24 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706397 A year ago, smarting over public criticism of its role in promoting division and stoking racism, Facebook announced a major shift in its newsfeed algorithm which would downrank posts from media organizations and uprank the things sent by your friends on the network, in the name of promotion a gentler form of "engagement" that would emphasize discourse over clickbait, which founder Mark Zuckerberg promised would be "time well spent."

A year later, Facebook's feeds are dominated by furious debates about abortion, religion and guns, sparked by Fox News stories shared by users' right-wing, racist friends and relatives. Fox stories attract twice as many "angry" emojis (??) as news from any other source. The top news table of stories from other sources tilt heavily towards hoaxes and conspiracies, including a fake story about New York State permitting abortions up to the predicted birth date, Henry Winkler being dead (he's not), the Momo hoax, and a fake site called "Conservative Tears."

The findings are documented in Newswhip's 2019 Guide to Facebook Publishing and summarized in an excellent Nieman Lab post.

There are a lot of takeaways here, the one that strikes me hardest is that this is a perfect story about the dangers of paying engineers by the amount of "engagement" their feature delivers from the system's users. We know that hoaxes, racism, acrimony, and harassment all increase the amount of time people spend engaging with a service, because these unpleasant things are hard to look away from. If you ask an engineer to maximize engagement without asking them to minimize these unpleasant things, you will always end up with a slot-machine whose jackpot is Fox News. Read the rest “Facebook's year-old "improvements" to the newsfeed have elevated enraging Fox News posts to the service's dominant form”

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A year ago, smarting over public criticism of its role in promoting division and stoking racism, Facebook announced a major shift in its newsfeed algorithm which would downrank posts from media organizations and uprank the things sent by your friends on the network, in the name of promotion a gentler form of "engagement" that would emphasize discourse over clickbait, which founder Mark Zuckerberg promised would be "time well spent."

A year later, Facebook's feeds are dominated by furious debates about abortion, religion and guns, sparked by Fox News stories shared by users' right-wing, racist friends and relatives. Fox stories attract twice as many "angry" emojis (??) as news from any other source. The top news table of stories from other sources tilt heavily towards hoaxes and conspiracies, including a fake story about New York State permitting abortions up to the predicted birth date, Henry Winkler being dead (he's not), the Momo hoax, and a fake site called "Conservative Tears."

The findings are documented in Newswhip's 2019 Guide to Facebook Publishing and summarized in an excellent Nieman Lab post.

There are a lot of takeaways here, the one that strikes me hardest is that this is a perfect story about the dangers of paying engineers by the amount of "engagement" their feature delivers from the system's users. We know that hoaxes, racism, acrimony, and harassment all increase the amount of time people spend engaging with a service, because these unpleasant things are hard to look away from. If you ask an engineer to maximize engagement without asking them to minimize these unpleasant things, you will always end up with a slot-machine whose jackpot is Fox News.

Engagement — likes, comments, shares, reactions — has risen. For the first few months of this year, it was 50 percent higher than it was in 2018, and about 10 percent higher than it was in 2017 (which, remember, included Trump’s inauguration, large-scale protests, and the chaotic early days of his presidency).

“There is a possibility that Facebook’s friends and family focus, getting people to read what their networks are sharing rather than what pages are promoting, may have contributed to this increase as people shared articles they enjoyed on the network,” NewsWhip says.

One year in, Facebook’s big algorithm change has spurred an angry, Fox News-dominated — and very engaged! — News Feed [Laura Hazard Owen/Nieman Lab]

(via Naked Capitalism)

(Image: Antoine Taveneaux, CC-BY-SA) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/anger-sells.html/feed 21 706397 Humans have a sixth sense for Earth's magnetic field http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/humans-have-a-sixth-sense-for.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/humans-have-a-sixth-sense-for.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:58:20 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706418 A new study suggests that humans can subconsciously sense Earth's magnetic field. While this capability, called magnetoreception, is well known in birds and fish, there is now evidence that our brains are also sensitive to magnetic fields. The researchers from Caltech and the University of Tokyo measured the brainwaves of 26 participants who were exposed to magnetic fields that could be manipulated. Interestingly, the brainwaves were not affected by upward-pointing fields. From Science News:

Participants in this study, who all hailed from the Northern Hemisphere, should perceive downward-pointing magnetic fields as natural, whereas upward fields would constitute an anomaly, the researchers argue. Magnetoreceptive animals are known to shut off their internal compasses when encountering weird fields, such as those caused by lightning, which might lead the animals astray. Northern-born humans may similarly take their magnetic sense “offline” when faced with strange, upward-pointing fields...

Even accounting for which magnetic changes the brain picks up, researchers still don’t know what our minds might use that information for, (Caltech neurobiologist and geophysicist Joseph) Kirschvink says. Another lingering mystery is how, exactly, our brains detect Earth’s magnetic field. According to the researchers, the brain wave patterns uncovered in this study may be explained by sensory cells containing a magnetic mineral called magnetite, which has been found in magnetoreceptive trout as well as in the human brain.

"Transduction of the Geomagnetic Field as Evidenced from Alpha-band Activity in the Human Brain" (eNeuro)

"Evidence for a Human Geomagnetic Sense" (Caltech) Read the rest “Humans have a sixth sense for Earth's magnetic field”

]]> A new study suggests that humans can subconsciously sense Earth's magnetic field. While this capability, called magnetoreception, is well known in birds and fish, there is now evidence that our brains are also sensitive to magnetic fields. The researchers from Caltech and the University of Tokyo measured the brainwaves of 26 participants who were exposed to magnetic fields that could be manipulated. Interestingly, the brainwaves were not affected by upward-pointing fields. From Science News:

Participants in this study, who all hailed from the Northern Hemisphere, should perceive downward-pointing magnetic fields as natural, whereas upward fields would constitute an anomaly, the researchers argue. Magnetoreceptive animals are known to shut off their internal compasses when encountering weird fields, such as those caused by lightning, which might lead the animals astray. Northern-born humans may similarly take their magnetic sense “offline” when faced with strange, upward-pointing fields...

Even accounting for which magnetic changes the brain picks up, researchers still don’t know what our minds might use that information for, (Caltech neurobiologist and geophysicist Joseph) Kirschvink says. Another lingering mystery is how, exactly, our brains detect Earth’s magnetic field. According to the researchers, the brain wave patterns uncovered in this study may be explained by sensory cells containing a magnetic mineral called magnetite, which has been found in magnetoreceptive trout as well as in the human brain.

"Transduction of the Geomagnetic Field as Evidenced from Alpha-band Activity in the Human Brain" (eNeuro)

"Evidence for a Human Geomagnetic Sense" (Caltech)]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/humans-have-a-sixth-sense-for.html/feed 38 706418 Imaginary dream computer from 1984 http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/imaginary-dream-computer-from.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/imaginary-dream-computer-from.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:43:50 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706417

The funny folks at Squirrel Monkey made a fantasy promotional video for a computer that never existed, called the DC 640. It had a number of cutting edge features, including a built-in LED alarm clock, an FM transmitter (for data and voice communication), and a solderless breadboard. Read the rest “Imaginary dream computer from 1984”

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The funny folks at Squirrel Monkey made a fantasy promotional video for a computer that never existed, called the DC 640. It had a number of cutting edge features, including a built-in LED alarm clock, an FM transmitter (for data and voice communication), and a solderless breadboard.

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Truck-eating bridge claims a new victim http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/truck-eating-bridge-claims-a-n.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/truck-eating-bridge-claims-a-n.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:21:15 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706394

On March 13, the driver of a Ryder truck missed multiple warnings signs and ran into infamous "can-opener" bridge in Durham, NC. People have been offering solutions for this problematic bridge for years, but there doesn't seem to one that will take care of the problem.

What about some kind of system that senses the height of the truck and unfurls a banner from the bridge that reads STOP! in red letters? Here's a mock-up of what I'm thinking:

Images: YouTube Read the rest “Truck-eating bridge claims a new victim”

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On March 13, the driver of a Ryder truck missed multiple warnings signs and ran into infamous "can-opener" bridge in Durham, NC. People have been offering solutions for this problematic bridge for years, but there doesn't seem to one that will take care of the problem.

What about some kind of system that senses the height of the truck and unfurls a banner from the bridge that reads STOP! in red letters? Here's a mock-up of what I'm thinking:

Images: YouTube

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For sale: home that inspired Emily Bront?'s Wuthering Heights http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/for-sale-home-that-inspired-e.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/for-sale-home-that-inspired-e.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:18:40 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706404 Yorkshire Post:

The most popular B&B room at Ponden Hall is the Earnshaw room. It features a tiny east gable window that exactly fits Emily Bront?’s description in Wuthering Heights of Cathy’s ghost scratching furiously at the glass trying to get in...

“We think that Emily based that scene on this room because old documents relating to the house describe a box bed in a room across from the library and you can see where it was bolted to the wall by the window. It is just how it is described in Wuthering Heights.

“Plus the date plaque above the main entrance identifies the hall as being rebuilt in 1801 and Emily’s story starts with that exact date,” says Julie who has had a replica box bed made for the room.

Read the rest “For sale: home that inspired Emily Bront?'s Wuthering Heights”

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Yorkshire Post:

The most popular B&B room at Ponden Hall is the Earnshaw room. It features a tiny east gable window that exactly fits Emily Bront?’s description in Wuthering Heights of Cathy’s ghost scratching furiously at the glass trying to get in...

“We think that Emily based that scene on this room because old documents relating to the house describe a box bed in a room across from the library and you can see where it was bolted to the wall by the window. It is just how it is described in Wuthering Heights.

“Plus the date plaque above the main entrance identifies the hall as being rebuilt in 1801 and Emily’s story starts with that exact date,” says Julie who has had a replica box bed made for the room.

]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/for-sale-home-that-inspired-e.html/feed 7 706404 Unvaccinated high school student is suing the health department for banning him from school during a chicken pox outbreak http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/unvaccinated-high-school-stude.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/unvaccinated-high-school-stude.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 17:12:35 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706400 An 18-year-old high school senior is suing the Northern Kentucky Health Department for banning him from school and sports during a chicken pox outbreak. He refuses to get vaccinated because of his "Christian faith," so the Health Department refuses to let him attend school or play sports.

"The fact that I can't finish my senior year in basketball, like, our last couple of games, it's pretty devastating. I mean, you go through four years of high school playing basketball, you look forward to your senior year," the student, Jerome Kunkel, told WLWT5.

According to NBC:

The health department announced the policy Feb. 21 in a letter to parents, citing an outbreak of chickenpox at the school.

It first warned parents of the outbreak Feb. 5, urging them to get their children vaccinated. By March 14, the school had 32 cases of confirmed chickenpox, according to the health department.

"The recent actions taken by the Northern Kentucky Health Department regarding the chickenpox outbreak at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart/Assumption Academy was in direct response to a public health threat and was an appropriate and necessary response to prevent further spread of this contagious illness," the health department said in a statement in response to Kunkel's lawsuit.

Chicken pox is an airborne virus that can also be contracted through physical contact. Although most people get through the illness without any lasting effects, it can be devastating to pregnant women, babies, and people with weakened immune systems.

Image: by F malan - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9575488 Read the rest “Unvaccinated high school student is suing the health department for banning him from school during a chicken pox outbreak”

]]> An 18-year-old high school senior is suing the Northern Kentucky Health Department for banning him from school and sports during a chicken pox outbreak. He refuses to get vaccinated because of his "Christian faith," so the Health Department refuses to let him attend school or play sports.

"The fact that I can't finish my senior year in basketball, like, our last couple of games, it's pretty devastating. I mean, you go through four years of high school playing basketball, you look forward to your senior year," the student, Jerome Kunkel, told WLWT5.

According to NBC:

The health department announced the policy Feb. 21 in a letter to parents, citing an outbreak of chickenpox at the school.

It first warned parents of the outbreak Feb. 5, urging them to get their children vaccinated. By March 14, the school had 32 cases of confirmed chickenpox, according to the health department.

"The recent actions taken by the Northern Kentucky Health Department regarding the chickenpox outbreak at Our Lady of the Sacred Heart/Assumption Academy was in direct response to a public health threat and was an appropriate and necessary response to prevent further spread of this contagious illness," the health department said in a statement in response to Kunkel's lawsuit.

Chicken pox is an airborne virus that can also be contracted through physical contact. Although most people get through the illness without any lasting effects, it can be devastating to pregnant women, babies, and people with weakened immune systems.

Image: by F malan - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=9575488

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A glowing, 3D printed rose that "blooms" when you touch its petals http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/bloomin-marvellous.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/bloomin-marvellous.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 16:41:47 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706390 Daren Schwenke's 3D printed blooming rose embeds a capacitive touch sensor -- a magnetic wire -- in one of the leaves, which trips an Arduino-controlled actuator that changes the rose's lighting and causes the petals -- 3D printed and then shaped over a hot chandelier bulb -- to splay open or fold closed.

The build log reveals a lively open-source hardware/free software collaboration that is a miniature, perfect case-study.

What finally materialized is a terrific combination of common hacker technologies. The petals are printed flat in nylon, then formed over a hot incandescent chandelier bulb. The stem and leaves are also printed, but the side stem has a piece of magnet wire embedded in the print as a capacitive touch sensor; when the leaf is touched, the rose blossom opens or closes. Magnet wire for the LEDs and a connecting rod for the mechanics run through the main stem to the base, where a 9g servo is responsible for controlling the bloom. The whole thing is controlled, naturally, with an Arduino. To move the project along a little more quickly, [Daren] enlisted the help of another Hack Chat denizen, [Morning.Star], who did an amazing job on the software without any access to the actual hardware.

A 3D Printed Blooming Rose For (Next) Valentines Day [Ted Yapo/Hackaday] Read the rest “A glowing, 3D printed rose that "blooms" when you touch its petals”

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Daren Schwenke's 3D printed blooming rose embeds a capacitive touch sensor -- a magnetic wire -- in one of the leaves, which trips an Arduino-controlled actuator that changes the rose's lighting and causes the petals -- 3D printed and then shaped over a hot chandelier bulb -- to splay open or fold closed.

The build log reveals a lively open-source hardware/free software collaboration that is a miniature, perfect case-study.

What finally materialized is a terrific combination of common hacker technologies. The petals are printed flat in nylon, then formed over a hot incandescent chandelier bulb. The stem and leaves are also printed, but the side stem has a piece of magnet wire embedded in the print as a capacitive touch sensor; when the leaf is touched, the rose blossom opens or closes. Magnet wire for the LEDs and a connecting rod for the mechanics run through the main stem to the base, where a 9g servo is responsible for controlling the bloom. The whole thing is controlled, naturally, with an Arduino. To move the project along a little more quickly, [Daren] enlisted the help of another Hack Chat denizen, [Morning.Star], who did an amazing job on the software without any access to the actual hardware.

A 3D Printed Blooming Rose For (Next) Valentines Day [Ted Yapo/Hackaday] ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/bloomin-marvellous.html/feed 4 706390 How this cute little steam-powered walker works http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/how-this-cute-little-steam-pow.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/how-this-cute-little-steam-pow.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 16:40:51 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706084

I-Wei Huang (aka Crabfu) makes all sorts of cool steam-powered mini-robots. In this video, he explains how he made a walking robot. Read the rest “How this cute little steam-powered walker works”

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I-Wei Huang (aka Crabfu) makes all sorts of cool steam-powered mini-robots. In this video, he explains how he made a walking robot.

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Video of Coney Island rides from the 1930s and 1940s that would never fly today http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/video-of-coney-island-rides-fr.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/video-of-coney-island-rides-fr.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 16:40:43 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706385 (VIDEO LINK)

Michael Hearst, composer of the classic "Songs for Ice Cream Trucks" and author of the excellent Unusual Creatures, shares this delightful video of seemingly quite dangerous rides at Coney Island in the 1930s and 1940s.

These sanctioned affronts to safety remind me of the fun I had rolling around with my brothers in our station wagon's cargo area on long road trips.

Read the rest “Video of Coney Island rides from the 1930s and 1940s that would never fly today”

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(VIDEO LINK)

Michael Hearst, composer of the classic "Songs for Ice Cream Trucks" and author of the excellent Unusual Creatures, shares this delightful video of seemingly quite dangerous rides at Coney Island in the 1930s and 1940s.

These sanctioned affronts to safety remind me of the fun I had rolling around with my brothers in our station wagon's cargo area on long road trips.

]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/video-of-coney-island-rides-fr.html/feed 26 706385 I woke up my long refrigerated sourdough starter http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/i-woke-up-my-long-refrigerated.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/i-woke-up-my-long-refrigerated.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 16:21:37 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706125 Everyone I know is on a sourdough kick. My sister was talking some stuff she learned in a class, so I took these photos to show her what "waking up the starter" means to me.

When I took my starter out of the fridge and looked in the crock I saw a deep pool of hooch. It has been since Thanksgiving that I used it, and I may have put this batch in the fridge back in June or July 2018.

I take a heaping spoonful of the starter and...

...gently mix it with 1/2 cup of warm water and 1/2 cup of flour. Then I set it aside for 4 hours.

I feed the starter every 4 hrs when I am awake, until it is awake. When I sleep the yeast can sleep. Once I have 2 cups of starter in my bowl, I discard 1/2 and add 1/2 cup of water and 1/2 cup of flour again, maintaining the volume at around 2 cups. When the starter looks like this, it is ready to use.

I used the starter, baking a loaf of bread in my Dutch Oven.

Bread with butter, jam and cheese was yesterday's meal. Read the rest “I woke up my long refrigerated sourdough starter”

]]> Everyone I know is on a sourdough kick. My sister was talking some stuff she learned in a class, so I took these photos to show her what "waking up the starter" means to me.

When I took my starter out of the fridge and looked in the crock I saw a deep pool of hooch. It has been since Thanksgiving that I used it, and I may have put this batch in the fridge back in June or July 2018.

I take a heaping spoonful of the starter and...

...gently mix it with 1/2 cup of warm water and 1/2 cup of flour. Then I set it aside for 4 hours.

I feed the starter every 4 hrs when I am awake, until it is awake. When I sleep the yeast can sleep. Once I have 2 cups of starter in my bowl, I discard 1/2 and add 1/2 cup of water and 1/2 cup of flour again, maintaining the volume at around 2 cups. When the starter looks like this, it is ready to use.

I used the starter, baking a loaf of bread in my Dutch Oven.

Bread with butter, jam and cheese was yesterday's meal.

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Electronic Health Records: a murderous, publicly subsidized, $13B/year grift by way of shitty software http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/failure-by-design.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/failure-by-design.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 15:25:25 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706361 In 2009, the bipartisan HITECH Act pledged $36 billion to subsidize the adoption of Electronic Health Records throughout America's fragmented, profit-driven health system, promising that the system would modernize American health care, save $80 billion (and countless lives), and deliver a host of other benefits; a decade later, the EHR industry has blossomed from $2B to $13B, and adoption is up from 9% to 96%, and it's a catastrophe.

Part of the problem lies in the structure of the HITECH Act itself: it created incentives for practices to buy "certification" EHR tools, but that certification was incredibly lax and allowed all kinds of terrible, buggy code to attain certification. The cash incentives were so great that companies poured fortunes into luring doctors to banquets where they were instructed on how to maximize their government subsidies, but the certification process did not protect doctors from unscrupulous vendors.

Importantly, a certified tool did not have to be standards-based, meaning that there was no requirement that patients be able to move their records from one practice to another (this is a feature, not a bug: the medical industry's term for a patient switching practices is "leakage," and the incompatibilities in rival practices' EHR tools were an excellent hedge against it, serving as a lock-in for patients). What's more, certified vendors were allowed to bind the healthcare providers to nondisclosure and nondisparagement clauses, making it illegal for them to warn other doctors about defects in EHR products.

To top things off, the HITECH Act did not establish any kind of FDA tracking system for complaints about bugs in EHR tools -- even bugs that maimed or killed patients. Read the rest “Electronic Health Records: a murderous, publicly subsidized, $13B/year grift by way of shitty software”

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In 2009, the bipartisan HITECH Act pledged $36 billion to subsidize the adoption of Electronic Health Records throughout America's fragmented, profit-driven health system, promising that the system would modernize American health care, save $80 billion (and countless lives), and deliver a host of other benefits; a decade later, the EHR industry has blossomed from $2B to $13B, and adoption is up from 9% to 96%, and it's a catastrophe.

Part of the problem lies in the structure of the HITECH Act itself: it created incentives for practices to buy "certification" EHR tools, but that certification was incredibly lax and allowed all kinds of terrible, buggy code to attain certification. The cash incentives were so great that companies poured fortunes into luring doctors to banquets where they were instructed on how to maximize their government subsidies, but the certification process did not protect doctors from unscrupulous vendors.

Importantly, a certified tool did not have to be standards-based, meaning that there was no requirement that patients be able to move their records from one practice to another (this is a feature, not a bug: the medical industry's term for a patient switching practices is "leakage," and the incompatibilities in rival practices' EHR tools were an excellent hedge against it, serving as a lock-in for patients). What's more, certified vendors were allowed to bind the healthcare providers to nondisclosure and nondisparagement clauses, making it illegal for them to warn other doctors about defects in EHR products.

To top things off, the HITECH Act did not establish any kind of FDA tracking system for complaints about bugs in EHR tools -- even bugs that maimed or killed patients.

The result is a predictable litany of grifter software: badly written spaghetti code that deletes doctor's notes, fails to assign meds to matients, assigns meds to the wrong patients, fails to delete meds when discontinued, and can't even merge records -- a test of one vendor's software found that it failed to merge duplicate records correctly half of the time.

EHRs are the bane of American doctors. They throw a steady stream of false-positive warnings -- a doctor might see hundreds of these in a day, such as a warning that a 6-year-old girl (or boy!) should be checked for pregnancy before a medicine is given to them -- combined with crazy, overcomplexified, redundant UIs that require doctors to click the same thing in multiple places for it to stick. An ER doctor makes about 4,000 clicks in their EHR terminals in a single shift.

With such terrible, numbing repetition, it's no wonder that the industry refers to EHRs as "Errors Happen Regularly." The systems are incredibly dehumanizing for doctors, who spend six hours/day editing EHRs (44% of that work is clerical, not related to patient care), and is cited as a major contributor to the physician burnout crisis, which has led to mass exodus from medicine as well as a string of awful suicides.

But there are some advantages to EHRs for medical practices: they're practically designed to facilitate and disguise "upbilling" (a euphemism for insurance fraud).

Despite this confluence of interests between crooked practices and crooked EHR vendors, there have been many high-profile lawsuits and regulatory action (a $155m False Claims Act settlement with Eclinical works, another for $57m with Greenway Health).

And EHRs have done some good: they've been vital in unraveling the true story of the opioid epidemic, and were used to diagnose lead as the underlying cause of the Flint water crisis.

But it's a bad tradeoff: a $36B public subsidy, the needless death and injury of American patients, the dehumanizing and demoralizing of doctors, all to make some forensics work marginally simpler.

A well-designed EHR program would, at the very least, mandate standards-defined interoperability, a ban on nondisclosures and nondisparagements, full source-code publication, and public tracking and redress for bugs in EHR systems. Without those, the HITECH Act was born to fail.

“You’re sitting in front of a patient, and there are so many things you have to do, and you only have so much time to do it in — seven to 11 minutes, probably — so when do you really listen?” asked John-Henry Pfifferling, a medical anthropologist who counsels physicians suffering from burnout. “If you go into medicine because you care about interacting, and then you’re just a tool, it’s dehumanizing,” said Pfifferling, who has seen many physicians leave medicine over the shift to electronic records. “It’s a disaster,” he said.

Beyond complicating the physician-patient relationship, EHRs have in some ways made practicing medicine harder, said Dr. Hal Baker, a physician and the chief information officer at WellSpan, a Pennsylvania hospital system. “Physicians have to cognitively switch between focusing on the record and focusing on the patient,” he said. He points out how unusual — and potentially dangerous — this is: “Texting while you’re driving is not a good idea. And I have yet to see the CEO who, while running a board meeting, takes minutes, and certainly I’ve never heard of a judge who, during the trial, would also be the court stenographer. But in medicine?…?we’ve asked the physician to move from writing in pen to [entering a computer] record, and it’s a pretty complicated interface.”

Even if docs may be at the keyboard during visits, they report having to spend hours more outside that time — at lunch, late at night — in order to finish notes and keep up with electronic paperwork (sending referrals, corresponding with patients, resolving coding issues). That’s right. EHRs didn’t take away paperwork; the systems just moved it online. And there’s a lot of it: 44 percent of the roughly six hours a physician spends on the EHR each day is focused on clerical and administrative tasks, like billing and coding, according to a 2017 Annals of Family Medicine study.

For all that so-called pajama time — the average physician logs 1.4 hours per day on the EHR after work — they don’t get a cent.

Where Electronic Health Records Went Wrong [Fred Schulte/Kaiser Health News; and Erika Fry/Fortune]

(via Naked Capitalism) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/failure-by-design.html/feed 30 706361 Psychedelics pioneer Ralph Metzner, RIP http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/psychedelics-pioneer-ralph-met.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/psychedelics-pioneer-ralph-met.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 14:56:35 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706340 (Erowid)

Read the rest “Psychedelics pioneer Ralph Metzner, RIP”

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]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/psychedelics-pioneer-ralph-met.html/feed 4 706340 Where does consciousness come from? http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/where-does-consciousness-come.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/where-does-consciousness-come.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 14:38:44 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706325 "Consciousness is what allows us to be aware of both our surroundings and our own inner state." In the first of a three part video series, "Kruzgesagt - In a Nutshell" examines "how unaware things come aware." Stay tuned for theories of consciousness that of course may be as much about philosophy as they are neuroscience.

Sources here.

Read the rest “Where does consciousness come from?”

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"Consciousness is what allows us to be aware of both our surroundings and our own inner state." In the first of a three part video series, "Kruzgesagt - In a Nutshell" examines "how unaware things come aware." Stay tuned for theories of consciousness that of course may be as much about philosophy as they are neuroscience.

Sources here.

]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/where-does-consciousness-come.html/feed 21 706325 Three dead in Netherlands tram shooting http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/one-dead-and-three-wounded-in.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/one-dead-and-three-wounded-in.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 13:09:35 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706314 Police are hunting for a gunman who shot at least four passengers on a train in Utrecht, killing three of them, then fled. BBC:

Police say the gunman is still at large. Trains and trams have stopped running and schools have been asked to keep their doors closed. Counter-terror police reportedly say the shooting "appears to be a terrorist attack". Dutch anti-terrorism co-ordinator Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg said all efforts were now focused on catching the gunman. He also said there could be more than one perpetrator.

Updates:

10:30 a.m. EDT Three of the victims are reported dead. Police say they are hunting a 37-year-old Turkish man named Gokmen Tanis. They issued a photograph of Tanis taken by security camera and warned everyone to stay away from him.

1:40 p.m. EDT Police arrested a suspect. Read the rest “Three dead in Netherlands tram shooting”

]]> Police are hunting for a gunman who shot at least four passengers on a train in Utrecht, killing three of them, then fled. BBC:

Police say the gunman is still at large. Trains and trams have stopped running and schools have been asked to keep their doors closed. Counter-terror police reportedly say the shooting "appears to be a terrorist attack". Dutch anti-terrorism co-ordinator Pieter-Jaap Aalbersberg said all efforts were now focused on catching the gunman. He also said there could be more than one perpetrator.

Updates:

10:30 a.m. EDT Three of the victims are reported dead. Police say they are hunting a 37-year-old Turkish man named Gokmen Tanis. They issued a photograph of Tanis taken by security camera and warned everyone to stay away from him.

1:40 p.m. EDT Police arrested a suspect.

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New iPad Mini, iPad Air http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/new-ipad-mini-ipad-air.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/new-ipad-mini-ipad-air.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 12:59:48 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706306 Android tablets being crummy and Microsoft ones being dismembered laptops, it's nice that Apple's unexpectedly announced new models of its aging iPad Mini and iPad Air.

The 10.5" iPad Air weighs one pound and starts at $499, while the 7.9" iPad Mini has pencil support, an ultra-high DPI and starts at $399. Both use Apple's latest A12 chips and have optional LTE.

The new Air effectively replaces last-gen iPads with something a little smaller and much more powerful, while the Mini should be especially interesting to artists and designers who don't want to hoik around a ~$800+ iPad Pro just to get dirty. From the press release it appears to be the last-gen pencil with the standard 60hz refresh rate, but even then the latency is in a league of its own. Read the rest “New iPad Mini, iPad Air”

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Android tablets being crummy and Microsoft ones being dismembered laptops, it's nice that Apple's unexpectedly announced new models of its aging iPad Mini and iPad Air.

The 10.5" iPad Air weighs one pound and starts at $499, while the 7.9" iPad Mini has pencil support, an ultra-high DPI and starts at $399. Both use Apple's latest A12 chips and have optional LTE.

The new Air effectively replaces last-gen iPads with something a little smaller and much more powerful, while the Mini should be especially interesting to artists and designers who don't want to hoik around a ~$800+ iPad Pro just to get dirty. From the press release it appears to be the last-gen pencil with the standard 60hz refresh rate, but even then the latency is in a league of its own.

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Watch French people try to say difficult English words http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/watch-french-people-try-to-say.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/watch-french-people-try-to-say.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 11:53:19 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706292

Hitting them with "Throughout" first is pretty sadistic. But that they stumble on "choir" suggests that they are hamming it up, un peu? Read the rest “Watch French people try to say difficult English words”

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Hitting them with "Throughout" first is pretty sadistic. But that they stumble on "choir" suggests that they are hamming it up, un peu?

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Report: U.S. Dept. of Transportation and Justice Department investigating FAA over Boeing 737 MAX http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/report-u-s-dept-of-transpor.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/18/report-u-s-dept-of-transpor.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 11:43:45 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=706288 The Wall Street Journal reports that the U.S. Department of Transportation has launched an investigation into the Federal Aviation Administration's approval of Boeing's 737 MAX jets. Two of the new airliners crashed in similar circumstances, killing hundreds of passengers, and American regulators were conspiciously slow to ground the jet even after flights were halted in other countries.

Federal prosecutors and Department of Transportation officials are scrutinizing the development of Boeing Co.’s 737 MAX jetliners, according to people familiar with the matter, unusual inquiries that come amid probes of regulators’ safety approvals of the new plane. A grand jury in Washington, D.C., issued a broad subpoena dated March 11 to at least one person involved in the 737 MAX’s development, seeking related documents, including correspondence, emails and other messages, one of these people said. The subpoena, with a prosecutor from the Justice Department’s criminal division listed as a contact, sought documents to be handed over later this month.

Read the rest “Report: U.S. Dept. of Transportation and Justice Department investigating FAA over Boeing 737 MAX”]]>
The Wall Street Journal reports that the U.S. Department of Transportation has launched an investigation into the Federal Aviation Administration's approval of Boeing's 737 MAX jets. Two of the new airliners crashed in similar circumstances, killing hundreds of passengers, and American regulators were conspiciously slow to ground the jet even after flights were halted in other countries.

Federal prosecutors and Department of Transportation officials are scrutinizing the development of Boeing Co.’s 737 MAX jetliners, according to people familiar with the matter, unusual inquiries that come amid probes of regulators’ safety approvals of the new plane. A grand jury in Washington, D.C., issued a broad subpoena dated March 11 to at least one person involved in the 737 MAX’s development, seeking related documents, including correspondence, emails and other messages, one of these people said. The subpoena, with a prosecutor from the Justice Department’s criminal division listed as a contact, sought documents to be handed over later this month.

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Cartoonist Kayfabe: Wizard Magazine 16, December 1992 http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/17/cartoonist-kayfabe-wizard-mag.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/03/17/cartoonist-kayfabe-wizard-mag.html#comments Mon, 18 Mar 2019 06:59:42 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=705954 Ed and Jim's investigation into the 1990's comic book speculation boom and bust continues! In this issue:

*The second wave of Image Comics creators is officially upon us with the release of Darker Image issue 1.

*Cartoonist Lea Hernandez drops some knowledge about the trials and tribulations of the comic book business.

*Palmer's Picks: Hepcats, and the first announcement of Peter Laird's monumental Xeric Grant for self publishers.

* Kevin Eastman creates the Words and Pictures museum!

*A Dale Keown interview talking about his soon to be published Image title, Pitt!

* Fan Favorite artist, Kelley Jones speaks to Wizard about his drawing career, from Neil Gaiman's Sandman comics to an Alien series published by Dark Horse comics

* Speaking of Neil Gaiman's Sandman, Wizard investigates the comic to see how it compares and contrasts with previous iterations of the DC Sandman character, dating back to the 1940s.

* All this and tons more.

-------------------------------

Subscribe to the Cartoonist Kayfabe youtube channel. New videos are posted often.

Cartoonist Kayfabe shirts and other merchandise at our new storefront! Read the rest “Cartoonist Kayfabe: Wizard Magazine 16, December 1992”

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Ed and Jim's investigation into the 1990's comic book speculation boom and bust continues! In this issue:

*The second wave of Image Comics creators is officially upon us with the release of Darker Image issue 1.

*Cartoonist Lea Hernandez drops some knowledge about the trials and tribulations of the comic book business.

*Palmer's Picks: Hepcats, and the first announcement of Peter Laird's monumental Xeric Grant for self publishers.

* Kevin Eastman creates the Words and Pictures museum!

*A Dale Keown interview talking about his soon to be published Image title, Pitt!

* Fan Favorite artist, Kelley Jones speaks to Wizard about his drawing career, from Neil Gaiman's Sandman comics to an Alien series published by Dark Horse comics

* Speaking of Neil Gaiman's Sandman, Wizard investigates the comic to see how it compares and contrasts with previous iterations of the DC Sandman character, dating back to the 1940s.

* All this and tons more.

-------------------------------

Subscribe to the Cartoonist Kayfabe youtube channel. New videos are posted often.

Cartoonist Kayfabe shirts and other merchandise at our new storefront!

]]>
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皇冠时时彩平台出租
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