Boing Boing http://www.9488038.com Brain candy for Happy Mutants Wed, 11 Sep 2019 02:01:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.3 https://i0.wp.com/www.9488038.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/apple-touch-icon-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 Boing Boing http://www.9488038.com 32 32 87954168 Google hit with demands for detailed ad business info from Texas and other states http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/google-hit-with-demands-for-de.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/google-hit-with-demands-for-de.html#comments Wed, 11 Sep 2019 01:44:22 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737381 PHOTO: Shutterstock. TX AG Ken Paxton, shown here, is leading nationwide probe into Google.

The Texas attorney general today issued a 29-page civil investigative demand with more than 200 directives for Google to provide detailed information on its ad business. The deadline is October 9.

“State attorneys general investigating Google are ordering it to turn over a wide range of information about its advertising business, according to an investigative demand that takes direct aim at the biggest source of the company’s revenue.”

The investigative demand seeks details on ad technology and acquisitions, and shows that the investigation is targeting the heart of Google's business model.

As Cory wrote earlier, “attorneys general from 48 states, DC, and Puerto Rico are collaborating on a joint antitrust investigation of Google's dominance in the ad- and search-markets, but two AGs are sitting this one out: California's Xavier Becerra and Alabama's Steve Marshall.”

From tonight's updated reporting by Bloomberg News:

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office, which is leading the nationwide probe, on Monday issued a 29-page civil investigative demand obtained by Bloomberg. In more than 200 directives, investigators ordered the company to produce detailed explanations and documents by Oct. 9 related to its sprawling system of online advertising products.

The Sept. 9 investigative demand, which is similar to a subpoena, was issued as 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico announced an antitrust investigation of Google from the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The attorneys general said they were looking at Google’s advertising practices, but their detailed demand to the company hasn’t been previously reported.

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PHOTO: Shutterstock. TX AG Ken Paxton, shown here, is leading nationwide probe into Google.

The Texas attorney general today issued a 29-page civil investigative demand with more than 200 directives for Google to provide detailed information on its ad business. The deadline is October 9.

“State attorneys general investigating Google are ordering it to turn over a wide range of information about its advertising business, according to an investigative demand that takes direct aim at the biggest source of the company’s revenue.”

The investigative demand seeks details on ad technology and acquisitions, and shows that the investigation is targeting the heart of Google's business model.

As Cory wrote earlier, “attorneys general from 48 states, DC, and Puerto Rico are collaborating on a joint antitrust investigation of Google's dominance in the ad- and search-markets, but two AGs are sitting this one out: California's Xavier Becerra and Alabama's Steve Marshall.”

From tonight's updated reporting by Bloomberg News:

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton’s office, which is leading the nationwide probe, on Monday issued a 29-page civil investigative demand obtained by Bloomberg. In more than 200 directives, investigators ordered the company to produce detailed explanations and documents by Oct. 9 related to its sprawling system of online advertising products.

The Sept. 9 investigative demand, which is similar to a subpoena, was issued as 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico announced an antitrust investigation of Google from the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. The attorneys general said they were looking at Google’s advertising practices, but their detailed demand to the company hasn’t been previously reported.

According to the document, the states want information about Google’s past acquisitions of advertising technology companies, including DoubleClick and AdMob; its top advertisers and publishers; data collection practices; pricing models; and the functions of the ad auction market that delivers ads across the internet.

The document’s questions dig deep into the “black box” of Google’s money-making machine and ask for a thorough explanation of how it all works. Even to experts, the ad tech market can seem opaque and dizzying in its complexity.

BLOOMBERG: Google Hit With Sweeping Demand From States Over Ad Business [ David McLaughlin , Gerrit De Vynck , and Naomi Nix, September 10, 2019, 5:01 PM MDT]

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Legend of Zelda theme played on marimba http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/legend-of-zelda-theme-played-o.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/legend-of-zelda-theme-played-o.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 23:45:16 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737372 You're going to want to unmute your sound for this one.

A beautiful rendition of the Legend of Zelda theme song, played on the marimba by Mart0zz.

NEVER forget the Legend!

This happy blast from the internet past is a great reminder that back in 2011, when it was first posted, not everything in technology was horrible.

Our very own arrangement of the Zelda theme.

Played on Marimba, Snare drum, Cymbal, Bells, Timpani and fucking Triangle!

Filmed and recorded in three days, however, we don't really enjoy drinking milk.

Buy our album here.

Read the rest

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You're going to want to unmute your sound for this one.

A beautiful rendition of the Legend of Zelda theme song, played on the marimba by Mart0zz.

NEVER forget the Legend!

This happy blast from the internet past is a great reminder that back in 2011, when it was first posted, not everything in technology was horrible.

Our very own arrangement of the Zelda theme.

Played on Marimba, Snare drum, Cymbal, Bells, Timpani and fucking Triangle!

Filmed and recorded in three days, however, we don't really enjoy drinking milk.

Buy our album here.

]]>
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Watch this sweet cat enjoy a gentle face rub http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/watch-this-sweet-cat-enjoy-a-g.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/watch-this-sweet-cat-enjoy-a-g.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 23:22:28 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737368 You definitely need some of this cuteness right now.

“My cat Tofu REALLY likes her cheeks rubbed,” says IMGURian kokorifado.

What a well-loved kitty cat.

My cat Tofu REALLY likes her cheeks rubbed.

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You definitely need some of this cuteness right now.

“My cat Tofu REALLY likes her cheeks rubbed,” says IMGURian kokorifado.

What a well-loved kitty cat.

My cat Tofu REALLY likes her cheeks rubbed.

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OAN sues Rachel Maddow, MSNBC, Comcast, NBC Universal for $10 million http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/oan-sues-rachel-maddow-msnbc.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/oan-sues-rachel-maddow-msnbc.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 23:14:01 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737342 One America News Network (OAN), a conservative news network for people who think Fox News is too liberal, has filed a $10 million dollar defamation lawsuit against Rachel Maddow, MSNBC and its parent companies Comcast and NBC Universal.

The network claims Maddow defamed them during an episode of her nightly show when she referred to OANN as "paid Russian propaganda."

Maddow was referencing OAN's employment of Kristian Brunovich Rouz as an on-air reporter covering US politics while he is also employed as a reporter for Sputnik, a Kremlin-owned news wire. If Sputnik sounds familiar, that could be because it was found to have been part of Russia's 2016 election interference scheme.

From The Daily Beast:

Rouz’s on-air reports for OAN include a wholly fabricated 2017 segment claiming Hillary Clinton is secretly bankrolling antifa through her political action committee. Clinton, Rouz claimed falsely, gave antifa protesters $800,000 that “went toward things like bricks, hammers, bats, and chains.”

OAN's lawsuit also claims that Comcast is engaging in anti-competitive censorship by refusing to carry the channel. No response as of yet from Maddow, Comcast, et al.

Herring Networks vs. Rachel Maddow (Scribd) (Photo: top, Shutterstock; below, Wikimedia Commons) Read the rest

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One America News Network (OAN), a conservative news network for people who think Fox News is too liberal, has filed a $10 million dollar defamation lawsuit against Rachel Maddow, MSNBC and its parent companies Comcast and NBC Universal.

The network claims Maddow defamed them during an episode of her nightly show when she referred to OANN as "paid Russian propaganda."

Maddow was referencing OAN's employment of Kristian Brunovich Rouz as an on-air reporter covering US politics while he is also employed as a reporter for Sputnik, a Kremlin-owned news wire. If Sputnik sounds familiar, that could be because it was found to have been part of Russia's 2016 election interference scheme.

From The Daily Beast:

Rouz’s on-air reports for OAN include a wholly fabricated 2017 segment claiming Hillary Clinton is secretly bankrolling antifa through her political action committee. Clinton, Rouz claimed falsely, gave antifa protesters $800,000 that “went toward things like bricks, hammers, bats, and chains.”

OAN's lawsuit also claims that Comcast is engaging in anti-competitive censorship by refusing to carry the channel. No response as of yet from Maddow, Comcast, et al.

Herring Networks vs. Rachel Maddow (Scribd) (Photo: top, Shutterstock; below, Wikimedia Commons)

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Juul gave marketing presentations to schoolchildren in the guise of "mental health/addiction" seminars http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/iphone-of-vapes.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/iphone-of-vapes.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 19:32:01 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737329 Juul is the cash-flush e-cigarette company whose billions (invested by Marlboro's parent company) have allowed it to create a massive market of addicted children, wiping out decades of progress in weaning children off of nicotine.

Now, the FDA has demanded that Juul answer claims that the company sent marketing representatives to schools to present during "mental health/addiction" seminars, where children were exposed to marketing messages promoting Juul products, told they were "totally safe" and "the Iphone of e-cigarettes." A Juul rep told a child who asked for advice for a friend who was addicted to nicotine to steer the friend towards using Juul products (the friend was already addicted to Juul products).

Juul's US-based products are stronger than those sold in other countries, with much higher levels of addictive nicotine.

Berkman’s son, Caleb Mintz, and a friend—who also testified at the hearing—said that the presentation was given during one of the school’s “mental health slash addiction” seminars, which are held at the school three times a year. The teens, who were in 9th grade at the time, said that to make the seminars a “safe space” where kids could speak openly, teachers are asked to leave the room.

Alone with the students, a Juul representative allegedly presented a “mixed message” by saying Juul products were “totally safe” and then “following up every ‘totally safe’ with ‘but we don’t want you as customers.’” The representative also took out a Juul device, called it the “iPhone of vapes,” and showed the students how it worked.

Read the rest

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Juul is the cash-flush e-cigarette company whose billions (invested by Marlboro's parent company) have allowed it to create a massive market of addicted children, wiping out decades of progress in weaning children off of nicotine.

Now, the FDA has demanded that Juul answer claims that the company sent marketing representatives to schools to present during "mental health/addiction" seminars, where children were exposed to marketing messages promoting Juul products, told they were "totally safe" and "the Iphone of e-cigarettes." A Juul rep told a child who asked for advice for a friend who was addicted to nicotine to steer the friend towards using Juul products (the friend was already addicted to Juul products).

Juul's US-based products are stronger than those sold in other countries, with much higher levels of addictive nicotine.

Berkman’s son, Caleb Mintz, and a friend—who also testified at the hearing—said that the presentation was given during one of the school’s “mental health slash addiction” seminars, which are held at the school three times a year. The teens, who were in 9th grade at the time, said that to make the seminars a “safe space” where kids could speak openly, teachers are asked to leave the room.

Alone with the students, a Juul representative allegedly presented a “mixed message” by saying Juul products were “totally safe” and then “following up every ‘totally safe’ with ‘but we don’t want you as customers.’” The representative also took out a Juul device, called it the “iPhone of vapes,” and showed the students how it worked. Caleb testified that his classmates were given the impression that the products were just a “flavor device that didn’t have any harmful substances in it.”

After the seminar, Caleb said he approached the Juul rep and told him that he had a friend struggling with a nicotine addiction. Caleb asked the rep for advice on behalf of his unnamed friend (who was actually the teen that testified alongside Caleb at the hearing). Caleb didn’t mention that his friend was using Juul devices. The Juul rep assumed that Caleb’s friend was smoking regular cigarettes. His advice, according to Caleb, was that his friend should switch from cigarettes to Juul.

Juul gave presentations in schools to kids—and the FDA is fuming [Beth Mole/Ars Technica] ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/iphone-of-vapes.html/feed 16 737329 Phoenix's police union has a secret deal with the department to purge dirty cops' disciplinary records http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/kevin-curbstomper-mcgowan.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/kevin-curbstomper-mcgowan.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 19:19:11 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737326 For two decades, the Phoenix police union has had a secret deal with the police department that required that the disciplinary records of cops would be "purged," so that no one, not even their supervisors, would be able to retrieve them.

As a result, Phoenix cops who repeatedly committed violent, corrupt acts -- including acts that resulted in severe injuries -- were allowed to serve on the force, even collecting commendations for their "good behavior."

The Arizona Republic undertook a deep investigation into the practice and uncovered more than 600 acts of wrongdoing committed by 525 cops (out of 3,000 PD employees) in just the past five years, with 90% of all "serious misconduct" incidents being purges from cops' records.

And as bad as this policy is, the Republic revealed that it was routinely abused, allowing cops to purge their records more quickly, and for graver offenses, than were officially permitted.

Scholarly work has found that serving alongside corrupt officers makes otherwise honorable officers corrupt, too, with a few bad apples actually spoiling the barrel. Allowing violent, corrupt cops to continue to serve, and to reoffend, compromises the whole force.

Officer Kevin McGowan, for example, earned top marks in his 2015 evaluation despite being disciplined for serious misconduct during the previous year.

An internal investigation concluded McGowan used excessive force when he stomped on an 18-year-old man’s neck, driving his face into the tile floor of a convenience store and knocking out three of the man's teeth.

The incident was captured in surveillance footage taken from the store.

Read the rest

]]> For two decades, the Phoenix police union has had a secret deal with the police department that required that the disciplinary records of cops would be "purged," so that no one, not even their supervisors, would be able to retrieve them.

As a result, Phoenix cops who repeatedly committed violent, corrupt acts -- including acts that resulted in severe injuries -- were allowed to serve on the force, even collecting commendations for their "good behavior."

The Arizona Republic undertook a deep investigation into the practice and uncovered more than 600 acts of wrongdoing committed by 525 cops (out of 3,000 PD employees) in just the past five years, with 90% of all "serious misconduct" incidents being purges from cops' records.

And as bad as this policy is, the Republic revealed that it was routinely abused, allowing cops to purge their records more quickly, and for graver offenses, than were officially permitted.

Scholarly work has found that serving alongside corrupt officers makes otherwise honorable officers corrupt, too, with a few bad apples actually spoiling the barrel. Allowing violent, corrupt cops to continue to serve, and to reoffend, compromises the whole force.

Officer Kevin McGowan, for example, earned top marks in his 2015 evaluation despite being disciplined for serious misconduct during the previous year.

An internal investigation concluded McGowan used excessive force when he stomped on an 18-year-old man’s neck, driving his face into the tile floor of a convenience store and knocking out three of the man's teeth.

The incident was captured in surveillance footage taken from the store.

The Police Department fired McGowan but he appealed and instead got a 30-day suspension.

Neither the stomping incident, his termination or suspension were mentioned in McGowan’s performance evaluation, according to records obtained by The Republic.

Phoenix police routinely 'purge' officer discipline records, keep misconduct secret [Justin Price/Arizona Republic]

Investigation Uncovers Mass Purging Of Phoenix Police Department Misconduct Records [Tim Cushing/Techdirt] ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/kevin-curbstomper-mcgowan.html/feed 18 737326 Creating a "coercion resistant" communications system http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/rule-of-law-security.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/rule-of-law-security.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 19:01:13 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737323 Eleanor Saitta's (previously) 2016 essay "Coercion-Resistant Design" (which is new to me) is an excellent introduction to the technical countermeasures that systems designers can employ to defeat non-technical, legal attacks: for example, the threat of prison if you don't back-door your product.

Saitta's paper advises systems designers to contemplate ways to arbitrage both the rule of law and technical pre-commitments to make it harder for governments to force you to weaken the security of your product or compromise your users.

A good example of this is Certificate Transparency, a distributed system designed to catch Certificate Authorities that cheat and issue certificates to allow criminals or governments to impersonate popular websites like Google.

Certificate Transparency is embedded in most browsers, which publish an automatic, cryptographically signed stream of observations about the certificates they encounter in the wild, with information about who issued them. These are appended to multiple log-servers in countries around the world, and anyone can monitor these servers to see if their own domain shows up in a certificate they don't recognize.

The upshot of this is that if you run a Certificate Authority and your government (or a criminal) says, "Issue a Google certificate so we can spy on people or we'll put you up against a wall and shoot you," you can say to them, "I will do this, but you should know that the gambit will be discovered within an hour, and within 48 hours, we will be out of business."

For an attacker to subvert this system, they'd need to compromise the browsers of everyone who they send the fake certificate to (if they can do this, they don't need fake certs!), or they need to hack multiple, well-guarded servers around the world, or they need to get the governments of all the countries where those servers are located to order their operators to secretly subvert them. Read the rest

]]> Eleanor Saitta's (previously) 2016 essay "Coercion-Resistant Design" (which is new to me) is an excellent introduction to the technical countermeasures that systems designers can employ to defeat non-technical, legal attacks: for example, the threat of prison if you don't back-door your product.

Saitta's paper advises systems designers to contemplate ways to arbitrage both the rule of law and technical pre-commitments to make it harder for governments to force you to weaken the security of your product or compromise your users.

A good example of this is Certificate Transparency, a distributed system designed to catch Certificate Authorities that cheat and issue certificates to allow criminals or governments to impersonate popular websites like Google.

Certificate Transparency is embedded in most browsers, which publish an automatic, cryptographically signed stream of observations about the certificates they encounter in the wild, with information about who issued them. These are appended to multiple log-servers in countries around the world, and anyone can monitor these servers to see if their own domain shows up in a certificate they don't recognize.

The upshot of this is that if you run a Certificate Authority and your government (or a criminal) says, "Issue a Google certificate so we can spy on people or we'll put you up against a wall and shoot you," you can say to them, "I will do this, but you should know that the gambit will be discovered within an hour, and within 48 hours, we will be out of business."

For an attacker to subvert this system, they'd need to compromise the browsers of everyone who they send the fake certificate to (if they can do this, they don't need fake certs!), or they need to hack multiple, well-guarded servers around the world, or they need to get the governments of all the countries where those servers are located to order their operators to secretly subvert them.

A related subject is Ulysses Pacts, when you precommit to a course of action in a moment of strength to guard against a future moment of weakness (like throwing away your Oreos when you start your diet so that future-you won't gorge yourself on them at 2AM). For example, you might build "binary transparency" in your update mechanism, so that if you are forced to send a poisoned update to one of your users, the user's own system will detect that they've gotten a different update from other users and sound the alarm. The only way to switch this off is to send them a poisoned update, and when you do that, the alarm goes off.

Other measures are legal: you can avoid putting employees or assets or partners in countries with laws that allow them to coerce you into compromising your security. Or you can put part of the company outside of those countries, and require things like commit-signing and review-signing before new builds go live.

Or you can split authorization -- signing keys, legal authority, both -- across multiple countries, either to arbitrage more favorable human rights regimes in some countries, or just to make a government attacker's job harder (if a government has to convince a hostile foreign government to cooperate in order to attack you, you might be safer).

A common legal form of Ulysses Pact is the warrant canary, in which you precommit to publishing a tally of how many secret warrants have been served on you. You start at zero, but once you get an order to undertake secret spying, you just stop publishing that tally.

The warrant canary highlights one weakness of coercion resistance: without the rule of law, many of these measures fail (see also: rubber hose cryptanalysis, whereby an attacker ties you to a chair and hits you with a rubber hose until you cough up the keys).

The premise of a warrant canary is that governments often have laws that allow them to silence you, but not laws that give them the power to force you to lie. So they can force you to stop publishing your warrant canary, but they can't force you to publish a false report.

But this is fragile: ostensibly democratic countries like Australia have banned using warrant canaries to reveal secret court orders.

Ultimately, cryptography and information security are important, but not because they allow us to build a separate realm in which corrupt, illegitimate states can never reach us, but because they allow us to keep the forces of reaction and corruption at bay temporarily, while we organize movements to make states pluralistic, just and accountable to the governed.

In practice, a system like this picks up from the segmented binary signing we already discussed. First, instead of a single key per team, we'd like to split each team's signature into an n-of-m threshold signature scheme. This ensures that no single user can provide their team-role's approval for an update. Handling key revocation is also important, and in a 2-of-3 key system, the remaining two keys can generate a trustable revocation for a compromised key and add a replacement key. Without this, you're stuck having a known-unsafe key sign its own replacement, a process that cannot happen securely. It may be advisable to have at least four keys, so that even if both keys involved in one step of a signing operation are judged compromised the system can still recover.

This set of keys (three parties, each with a 2-of-4 threshold signature key set) are used to sign both the update itself and a metadata file for the update (the contents of which are duplicated inside the update package) which contains a timestamp, along with file hashes and download locations. Clients will refuse to install an update with a timestamp older than their current version, preventing replay attacks, and updates can also be expired if this proves necessary. The metadata file is signed offline by all parties, like the build, but the parties also operate a chained secure timestamping service with lower-value, online keys. The timestamping service regularly re-signs the metadata file with a current timestamp and an additional set of signatures, ensuring that clients can determine if the update offer they're presented with is recent and allowing them to detect cases where an adversary is blocking their access to the update service but has not compromised the timestamp keys. The continued availability of the file also acts as an indicator that all three segments of the organization are willing to work together, and functions as a form of warrant canary, although an explicit canary statement could also be added. In some cases, there is precedent for forcing service providers to continue “regular” or automatic operations that, if stopped, could reveal a warrant. Given this, generating some of the contents of the timestamp file by hand and on an irregular but still at least daily basis might be useful?—?call it, say, the organization's blog. The timestamp portion of this scheme does depend on client clock accuracy. A variation is possible which does not require this, but it loses the ability to detect some “freeze” attacks against update systems.

Metadata files are among other things attestations to the existence of signed updates. To this end, it's important that all users see all of them so the set of metadata files forms a record of every piece of code the organization has shipped. Every metadata file should contain the hash of the previous file, and clients should refuse to trust a metadata file that refers to a previous file they haven't seen (the current metadata file chain will need to ship with initial downloads). If a client sees multiple metadata files that point to the same previous version, they should distrust all of them, preventing forks. To ensure there is a global consensus among clients as to the set of metadata files in existence, instead of putting them out on a mirror the development team should upload files into a distributed hash table maintained by the clients for this purpose. This ensures all clients see all attested signatures, and will only install updates they know other clients have also seen. Clients can even refuse to install updates until a quorum of their neighbors have already trusted the update, although some clients will have to go first, possibly randomly. Clients may connect to their DHT neighbors via Tor, to make targeting of Sybil attacks more difficult. If this is done correctly, it will be impossible for the organization to make the update system hide the existence of a signed update.

Coercion-Resistant Design [Eleanor Saitta/Dymaxion]

(via Four Short Links)

(Image: XKCD) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/rule-of-law-security.html/feed 3 737323 Stephen King talks about his new novel, The Institute http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/stephen-king-talks-about-his-n.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/stephen-king-talks-about-his-n.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 18:35:52 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737315

George Stephanopoulos asked Stephen King to describe his new (and 61st!) book, The Institute. His answer, "Tom Brown's Schooldays go to Hell." Sounds like my kind of book, considering Tom Brown's schooldays were already pretty awful.

Image: Good Morning America/YouTube Read the rest

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George Stephanopoulos asked Stephen King to describe his new (and 61st!) book, The Institute. His answer, "Tom Brown's Schooldays go to Hell." Sounds like my kind of book, considering Tom Brown's schooldays were already pretty awful.

Image: Good Morning America/YouTube

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California to force NCAA to pay athletes http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/rah-rah-sis-boom-bah.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/rah-rah-sis-boom-bah.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 18:33:04 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737317 The NCAA is notionally an "amateur" league, but the only thing amateur about it is that the athletes (who risk their health and even their lives) are unpaid, while the universities effectively own and operate wildly profitable pro sports teams.

California state senator Nancy Skinner [D] has cosponsored the The Fair Pay to Play Act, which entitles California college athletes to get paid for "the use of their name, image and likeness." The bill -- popular with both labor activists and free market ideologues -- passed the Assembly on Monday 72-0. Governor Newsom is expected to sign the bill in the next 30 days, and it would go into effect in 2023.

The NCAA and the colleges that back it strongly oppose the legislation. Athletes like LeBron James strongly support it (and James has received public support from Bernie Sanders: "College athletes are workers. Pay them.").

The colleges say it spells the end of California's participation in collegiate sports, predicting that California teams will be excluded from national play (they don't mention the possibility that other states will pass legislation similar to California's).

Reducing the importance of college sports to America's universities would be a net positive; American higher-ed has been wildly distorted by sports, with budgets and resources allocated to sports as a way of making alumni happy, without regard to the actual educational priorities of the institutions.

Skinner expects opponents to mount court challenges during that time, but she also anticipates a growing corps of allies.

Similar bills are in their infancy in state legislatures in Washington and Colorado, and United States Representative Mark Walker, Republican of North Carolina, introduced a federal bill this year that would allow college athletes to be compensated for the use of their name, image and likeness.

Read the rest

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The NCAA is notionally an "amateur" league, but the only thing amateur about it is that the athletes (who risk their health and even their lives) are unpaid, while the universities effectively own and operate wildly profitable pro sports teams.

California state senator Nancy Skinner [D] has cosponsored the The Fair Pay to Play Act, which entitles California college athletes to get paid for "the use of their name, image and likeness." The bill -- popular with both labor activists and free market ideologues -- passed the Assembly on Monday 72-0. Governor Newsom is expected to sign the bill in the next 30 days, and it would go into effect in 2023.

The NCAA and the colleges that back it strongly oppose the legislation. Athletes like LeBron James strongly support it (and James has received public support from Bernie Sanders: "College athletes are workers. Pay them.").

The colleges say it spells the end of California's participation in collegiate sports, predicting that California teams will be excluded from national play (they don't mention the possibility that other states will pass legislation similar to California's).

Reducing the importance of college sports to America's universities would be a net positive; American higher-ed has been wildly distorted by sports, with budgets and resources allocated to sports as a way of making alumni happy, without regard to the actual educational priorities of the institutions.

Skinner expects opponents to mount court challenges during that time, but she also anticipates a growing corps of allies.

Similar bills are in their infancy in state legislatures in Washington and Colorado, and United States Representative Mark Walker, Republican of North Carolina, introduced a federal bill this year that would allow college athletes to be compensated for the use of their name, image and likeness.

Skinner sees her bill as a catalyst rather than an end unto itself.

California Lawmakers Vote to Undo N.C.A.A. Amateurism [Billy Witz/New York Times]

(Image: Ervins Strauhmanis, CC-BY, modified)

(via Naked Capitalism) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/rah-rah-sis-boom-bah.html/feed 19 737317 Everyone's investigating Google for antitrust violations...except California and Alabama http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/wtf-ca-al.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/wtf-ca-al.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 18:14:54 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737306 The attorneys general from 48 states, DC, and Puerto Rico are collaborating on a joint antitrust investigation of Google's dominance in the ad- and search-markets, but two AGs are sitting this one out: California's Xavier Becerra and Alabama's Steve Marshall.

Becerra's motives are easy to speculate about: although he talks a good game on reining in corporate power, he also depends heavily on Google for his election campaign funding, and he presides over the state where Google (and other digital monopolists) were founded, and which they notionally call home (though for tax purposes, all Big Tech companies are located at an indeterminate point somewhere in the Irish Sea).

No one's sure what Marshall's up to, though. He's a rip-snortin' Republican from a red, rural state. It's possible that he's been so brainwashed by the weird Republican pro-monopoly cultists that he opposes the investigation on ideological grounds, I suppose.

It's a pretty bad look for both of them.

Google has been one of the top contributors to Becerra’s recent campaigns. The company contributed $US10,200 to his 2016 re-election campaign as a member of the US House of Representatives, making it his eight largest contributor in that campaign cycle, according to OpenSecrets. The search giant contributed $US7,300 to his campaign for attorney general last year, according to data from the California Secretary of State’s office.

Becerra’s lack of participation in the Google investigation drew condemnation from the other side of the political aisle.

“Attorney General Becerra’s refusal to join the bipartisan investigation into the tech giants is embarrassing,” California Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham, a Republican, said in an emailed statement.

Read the rest

]]> The attorneys general from 48 states, DC, and Puerto Rico are collaborating on a joint antitrust investigation of Google's dominance in the ad- and search-markets, but two AGs are sitting this one out: California's Xavier Becerra and Alabama's Steve Marshall.

Becerra's motives are easy to speculate about: although he talks a good game on reining in corporate power, he also depends heavily on Google for his election campaign funding, and he presides over the state where Google (and other digital monopolists) were founded, and which they notionally call home (though for tax purposes, all Big Tech companies are located at an indeterminate point somewhere in the Irish Sea).

No one's sure what Marshall's up to, though. He's a rip-snortin' Republican from a red, rural state. It's possible that he's been so brainwashed by the weird Republican pro-monopoly cultists that he opposes the investigation on ideological grounds, I suppose.

It's a pretty bad look for both of them.

Google has been one of the top contributors to Becerra’s recent campaigns. The company contributed $US10,200 to his 2016 re-election campaign as a member of the US House of Representatives, making it his eight largest contributor in that campaign cycle, according to OpenSecrets. The search giant contributed $US7,300 to his campaign for attorney general last year, according to data from the California Secretary of State’s office.

Becerra’s lack of participation in the Google investigation drew condemnation from the other side of the political aisle.

“Attorney General Becerra’s refusal to join the bipartisan investigation into the tech giants is embarrassing,” California Assemblyman Jordan Cunningham, a Republican, said in an emailed statement. “California deserves to be at the table.”

California and Alabama are the only two states that aren't participating in the giant antitrust investigation of Google, and neither is really saying why [Troy Wolverton/Business Insider]

(via Naked Capitalism) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/wtf-ca-al.html/feed 14 737306 Great deal on Hanes T-shirts 4-pack http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/great-deal-on-hanes-t-shirts.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/great-deal-on-hanes-t-shirts.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 18:14:35 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737299 Amazon has a good sale on these four packs of Hanes black T-shirts with pockets. I usually get Gildan Ts, but these are even cheaper right now. Read the rest

]]> Amazon has a good sale on these four packs of Hanes black T-shirts with pockets. I usually get Gildan Ts, but these are even cheaper right now.

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Startup that raised $197 million appears to have plagiarized the words, images, and design of a competitor http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/startup-that-raised-197-milli.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/startup-that-raised-197-milli.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 17:53:02 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737293 A well-funded startup called Hims, which sells subscriptions to generic viagra and cialis, launched a digital doctor's visit service so people can get a prescription without having to visit a doctor. Weirdly, it looks like they lifted almost everything from the website of a competitor, called Roman. Check out the Medium article that's loaded with examples of the swipes here, which was written by the cofounder of Roman. Read the rest

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A well-funded startup called Hims, which sells subscriptions to generic viagra and cialis, launched a digital doctor's visit service so people can get a prescription without having to visit a doctor. Weirdly, it looks like they lifted almost everything from the website of a competitor, called Roman. Check out the Medium article that's loaded with examples of the swipes here, which was written by the cofounder of Roman.

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America's life-expectancy income-gap widens precipitously http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/82-yrs-vs-64-yrs.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/82-yrs-vs-64-yrs.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 17:29:35 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737289 For years, researchers have tracked the discrepancy in average life-expectancy predicted by income equality, and, as with the wealth gap itself, this life-expectancy gap just keeps getting wider.

A new, Bernie Sanders-commissioned report from the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office reveals that, as with the gap in wealth between the 1% and the 10%, there is a large gap in life-expectancy between the top 1% and the top 10%, and the top 10% and the 11th-20th percentiles.

As alarming as this might be to wealthy people who aren't quite wealthy enough to expect those extra years, things are worst for the poorest 80%, whose expected lifespans have decreased so much that the national median life-expectancy for all Americans is actually in decline, as the losses for poor people swamp the gains made by the rich, the super-rich, and the unfathomably rich.

What kills old people without enough money? A major factor is a lack of retirement savings, which is an artifact of the annihilation of employer-managed, defined-benefit pensions in favor of 401(k)s and similar systems that make your ability to feed yourself in your old age contingent on your ability to successfully guess which stocks to buy (notably, your bad pension market decisions represent profit for the people who have the most money in America).

Another factor: the lack of stable housing (thanks in part to the foreclosure crisis and the erosion of tenant protections).

“Over time, the top fifth of the income distribution is really becoming a lot wealthier — and so much of the health and wealth gains in America are going toward the top,” said Harold Pollack, a health-care expert at the University of Chicago who was not involved in the creation of the report.

Read the rest

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For years, researchers have tracked the discrepancy in average life-expectancy predicted by income equality, and, as with the wealth gap itself, this life-expectancy gap just keeps getting wider.

A new, Bernie Sanders-commissioned report from the nonpartisan Government Accountability Office reveals that, as with the gap in wealth between the 1% and the 10%, there is a large gap in life-expectancy between the top 1% and the top 10%, and the top 10% and the 11th-20th percentiles.

As alarming as this might be to wealthy people who aren't quite wealthy enough to expect those extra years, things are worst for the poorest 80%, whose expected lifespans have decreased so much that the national median life-expectancy for all Americans is actually in decline, as the losses for poor people swamp the gains made by the rich, the super-rich, and the unfathomably rich.

What kills old people without enough money? A major factor is a lack of retirement savings, which is an artifact of the annihilation of employer-managed, defined-benefit pensions in favor of 401(k)s and similar systems that make your ability to feed yourself in your old age contingent on your ability to successfully guess which stocks to buy (notably, your bad pension market decisions represent profit for the people who have the most money in America).

Another factor: the lack of stable housing (thanks in part to the foreclosure crisis and the erosion of tenant protections).

“Over time, the top fifth of the income distribution is really becoming a lot wealthier — and so much of the health and wealth gains in America are going toward the top,” said Harold Pollack, a health-care expert at the University of Chicago who was not involved in the creation of the report. “In these fundamental areas — life expectancy, health — there are these growing disparities that are really a failure of social policy.”

The GAO report was commissioned in 2016 by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.), who sits on the Senate Budget Committee, after he met with people from McDowell County, W.Va., where the life expectancy is 64 years, according to the senator’s aides. That is on par with Mongolia. Fairfax County, Va., about 350 miles away, has a life expectancy of 82 years.

Poor and middle-class Americans are much less likely to survive into their 70s than the wealthy, federal report says [Christopher Ingraham and Jeff Stein/Washington Post]

(via Naked Capitalism)]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/82-yrs-vs-64-yrs.html/feed 34 737289 Someone made a single bitcoin transaction of over a billion dollars http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/someone-made-a-single-bitcoin.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/someone-made-a-single-bitcoin.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 17:24:37 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737281 I would say 94,504 bitcoins is real folding money, buy you can't fold bitcoins. In any case, someone moved $1,018,147,900 worth of bitcoin between wallets and no one knows for sure who it was. The Token Analyst tweeted, "We took a look and saw that a large percentage of it could be traced to @HuobiGlobal addresses."

Huobi Global is a Singapore based cryptocurrency exchange.

Image: Token Analyst/Twitter Read the rest

]]> I would say 94,504 bitcoins is real folding money, buy you can't fold bitcoins. In any case, someone moved $1,018,147,900 worth of bitcoin between wallets and no one knows for sure who it was. The Token Analyst tweeted, "We took a look and saw that a large percentage of it could be traced to @HuobiGlobal addresses."

Huobi Global is a Singapore based cryptocurrency exchange.

Image: Token Analyst/Twitter

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Penske truck lands on the roof of a house in freak accident http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/penske-truck-lands-on-the-roof.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/penske-truck-lands-on-the-roof.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 17:04:37 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737273

This is a maneuver that would be hard to replicate. A Penske truck is headed down a highway in Ontario, Canada when it hits a ditch, crashes into a utility pole, and then somehow leaps up to the roof of a house. The video was caught on a dashcam from a driver headed home from work.

Image: YouTube Read the rest

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This is a maneuver that would be hard to replicate. A Penske truck is headed down a highway in Ontario, Canada when it hits a ditch, crashes into a utility pole, and then somehow leaps up to the roof of a house. The video was caught on a dashcam from a driver headed home from work.

Image: YouTube

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This guy re-made a classic Nintendo home arcade video game console http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/homearcade.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/homearcade.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:57:11 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737257 Seriously impressive re-creation of a Nintendo “Home Arcade” classic video arcade unit by an inspired retrogaming enthusiast.

It runs on Windows 7 and uses HyperSpin as a frontend for loading games from over 70 systems.

“After seeing some inspiration from /r/cade I was determined to spend some time building a home arcade cabinet for my basement,” says IMGURian rubee64.

“I had little to no woodworking experience, but by the end I'd acquire a dozen new tools (including a table saw) and learned a great deal about materials and the assembly process.”

The project took 5 months of planning and work.

Once I had the overall model worked out, I needed to learn a little bit about wiring the buttons (something I’d never done before). After some research I settled on a 56pin I-PAC 4 from Ultimarc. This was just short of the total buttons I was going to need (after Player/Coin and Admin buttons) but I figured it would get me most of the way there.

I ordered it along with several sample button types and built a test arcade pad out of MDF to get familiar with my wiring and drilling.

Scroll through the entire gallery to get a sense of the intricate level of detail and mastery behind this project. Read the rest

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Seriously impressive re-creation of a Nintendo “Home Arcade” classic video arcade unit by an inspired retrogaming enthusiast.

It runs on Windows 7 and uses HyperSpin as a frontend for loading games from over 70 systems.

“After seeing some inspiration from /r/cade I was determined to spend some time building a home arcade cabinet for my basement,” says IMGURian rubee64.

“I had little to no woodworking experience, but by the end I'd acquire a dozen new tools (including a table saw) and learned a great deal about materials and the assembly process.”

The project took 5 months of planning and work.

Once I had the overall model worked out, I needed to learn a little bit about wiring the buttons (something I’d never done before). After some research I settled on a 56pin I-PAC 4 from Ultimarc. This was just short of the total buttons I was going to need (after Player/Coin and Admin buttons) but I figured it would get me most of the way there.

I ordered it along with several sample button types and built a test arcade pad out of MDF to get familiar with my wiring and drilling.

Scroll through the entire gallery to get a sense of the intricate level of detail and mastery behind this project.

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PrivacySafe: The Anti-Cloud Appliance http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/privacysafe-the-anti-cloud-ap.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/privacysafe-the-anti-cloud-ap.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:52:47 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737256

Boing Boing is proudly sponsored by Privacy Safe!

PrivacySafe is building the anti-cloud. For the first time, you can order a portable, private, and secure IoT storage appliance built on a fully-open stack.

Pre-order now to take advantage of early-bird pricing and get discounts on other privacy-respecting services and open hardware.

https://privacysafe.ai/indiegogo

Pocket-sized! Cutting edge, military-grade encryption Free and Open-Source Software and Open Hardware, so it can be completely audited for malicious code. Your files are encrypted locally, in your home or business, on hardware you can touch. Tor .onion addressing BTCPay Bitcoin payment processing. Avoid payment fees, forever! Monero wallet on-board Malware protection with real-time virus scan, network, and bluetooth monitor Password vault with keyring and strong passphrase generator

Read the rest

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Boing Boing is proudly sponsored by Privacy Safe!

PrivacySafe is building the anti-cloud. For the first time, you can order a portable, private, and secure IoT storage appliance built on a fully-open stack.

Pre-order now to take advantage of early-bird pricing and get discounts on other privacy-respecting services and open hardware.

https://privacysafe.ai/indiegogo

  • Pocket-sized!
  • Cutting edge, military-grade encryption
  • Free and Open-Source Software and Open Hardware, so it can be completely audited for malicious code.
  • Your files are encrypted locally, in your home or business, on hardware you can touch.
  • Tor .onion addressing
  • BTCPay Bitcoin payment processing. Avoid payment fees, forever!
  • Monero wallet on-board
  • Malware protection with real-time virus scan, network, and bluetooth monitor
  • Password vault with keyring and strong passphrase generator

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Watch Apple's special event live http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/watch-apples-special-event-l.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/watch-apples-special-event-l.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:49:48 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737259

Apple will announce the iPhone 11 at 10am PT today. Here's the live stream. Read the rest

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Apple will announce the iPhone 11 at 10am PT today. Here's the live stream.

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Trump fires John Bolton's moustache http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/trump-fires-john-bolton.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/trump-fires-john-bolton.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:47:47 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737248 President Trump this morning fired John Bolton, his national security mustache. Trump cited various disagreements with him over policy.

I informed John Bolton last night that his services are no longer needed at the White House. I disagreed strongly with many of his suggestions, as did others in the Administration, and therefore. ... I asked John for his resignation, which was given to me this morning. I thank John very much for his service. I will be naming a new National Security Advisor next week.

After his firing, Bolton immediately tweeted that he had tried to resign last night, but Trump fobbed him off. Enjoy this a rapid-fire entry in the annals of Trump collaborators haplessly trying to get back in front of him after he publicly humiliates them on Twitter.

Read the rest

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President Trump this morning fired John Bolton, his national security mustache. Trump cited various disagreements with him over policy.

I informed John Bolton last night that his services are no longer needed at the White House. I disagreed strongly with many of his suggestions, as did others in the Administration, and therefore. ... I asked John for his resignation, which was given to me this morning. I thank John very much for his service. I will be naming a new National Security Advisor next week.

After his firing, Bolton immediately tweeted that he had tried to resign last night, but Trump fobbed him off. Enjoy this a rapid-fire entry in the annals of Trump collaborators haplessly trying to get back in front of him after he publicly humiliates them on Twitter.

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My old Lodge chicken roasting pan bakes sourdough loaves, pizza and fries chicken http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/my-old-lodge-chicken-roasting.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/my-old-lodge-chicken-roasting.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:43:38 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737219 I gave my mother my treasured 5-quart Lodge deep skillet and lid when I found a lovely antique to restore. I've been using it while visiting with them.

It was no easy thing when I gave my Mom my Lodge chicken pan. I had been using it for ages as my primary skillet and perfected fried chicken in it, as many of my colleagues here at Boing Boing will attest.

I have been instructed that his style skillet be called a chicken ROASTING pan and the lid's stalactite-like points are what makes it a 'self-basting' lid. Evidently 1 roaster size chicken (3-5lbs iirc) will fit in it, and with the lid on the bird will roast up nice and juicy.

I have never done this. I bought it to fry chicken. I learned it was awesome for frying eggs, bacon, pancake and sauteeing things. It became the most used item in my kitchen. Then I started baking in it like a Dutch Oven.

The Lodge ended its daily use, however, when I found a larger Wagner pan at the Goodwill and restored it. I started baking in my dutch oven. It is a bit easier to maneuver. When cast iron sits and isn't used, it needs to be used and this pan was truly special. I tried alternating between it and my Wagner, but the extra space and smoother finish of the Wagner kept it on my stove. It was a little easier to fry bacon and sear steaks and fish in the #9 vs the #8 pan. Read the rest

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I gave my mother my treasured 5-quart Lodge deep skillet and lid when I found a lovely antique to restore. I've been using it while visiting with them.

It was no easy thing when I gave my Mom my Lodge chicken pan. I had been using it for ages as my primary skillet and perfected fried chicken in it, as many of my colleagues here at Boing Boing will attest.

I have been instructed that his style skillet be called a chicken ROASTING pan and the lid's stalactite-like points are what makes it a 'self-basting' lid. Evidently 1 roaster size chicken (3-5lbs iirc) will fit in it, and with the lid on the bird will roast up nice and juicy.

I have never done this. I bought it to fry chicken. I learned it was awesome for frying eggs, bacon, pancake and sauteeing things. It became the most used item in my kitchen. Then I started baking in it like a Dutch Oven.

The Lodge ended its daily use, however, when I found a larger Wagner pan at the Goodwill and restored it. I started baking in my dutch oven. It is a bit easier to maneuver. When cast iron sits and isn't used, it needs to be used and this pan was truly special. I tried alternating between it and my Wagner, but the extra space and smoother finish of the Wagner kept it on my stove. It was a little easier to fry bacon and sear steaks and fish in the #9 vs the #8 pan.

My mother, who has even more kitchen gadgets than I do, did not have a deep cast-iron skillet and my father really likes the aforementioned fried chicken. The pan had a new home.

I've long meant to try a good friend's sourdough starter and he brought us some of his families long-treasured yeast. It is an amazing starter that is very, very different than the one I've long maintained in Northern California. It is more liquid and much easier to work with at the same 1:1 hydration -- but I haven't figured its cycles out yet. I do have 10 years or more working with the other one.

Sourdough has put this Lodge chicken pan back to work as my Dutch oven. I haven't perfected bread yet, but I'm getting there. The starter is wonderful, but I'm still figuring out how long to let things rise with it, and how hot this oven really is.

I'll get there.

I've been using all the sourdough discard to make pizza, and this skillet makes amazing deep-dish pizza.

My time in Chicago taught me that deep-dish doesn't have to be fancy. You can use my quick pizza dough recipe, oil the pan with olive oil drop in the whole ball of dough and moosh it into a pie. Get the dough 1 1/2" up the sides of the pan and then fill with cheese, toppings, sauce and another layer of cheese.

If you are making pizza for my mom, put the basil on top. She likes it.

Bake at 400F for 18-20min

I have some fried chicken sitting in buttermilk, I'll make it for my dad after it has had its obligatory 3 days. A good fry with peanut oil will certainly make the pan happy.

Lodge L10CF3 Cast Iron Covered Deep Skillet, Pre-Seasoned, 5-Quart via Amazon

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I want to visit this exotic fruit stand in Florida http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/i-want-to-visit-this-exotic-fr.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/i-want-to-visit-this-exotic-fr.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:43:07 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737235

If you're interested in learning about fruit you probably have never heard of, I recommend a book called The Fruit Hunters by Adam Leith Gollner. I read it over 10 years ago and often think about the odd fruits and delightful people who are obsessed with them.

I was reminded of Gollner's book again when I saw this Great Big Story video about Robert Moehling, who has an exotic fruit stand in Florida. I really want to try some guanabana. The sign for it at Robert's fruit stand says, "Melts in your mouth like cotton candy. Virtually impossible to explain how wonderful it tastes. Best tasting fruit in the world!!!"

Image: Great Big Story/YouTube Read the rest

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If you're interested in learning about fruit you probably have never heard of, I recommend a book called The Fruit Hunters by Adam Leith Gollner. I read it over 10 years ago and often think about the odd fruits and delightful people who are obsessed with them.

I was reminded of Gollner's book again when I saw this Great Big Story video about Robert Moehling, who has an exotic fruit stand in Florida. I really want to try some guanabana. The sign for it at Robert's fruit stand says, "Melts in your mouth like cotton candy. Virtually impossible to explain how wonderful it tastes. Best tasting fruit in the world!!!"

Image: Great Big Story/YouTube

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This wild honey harvest how-to video is delightful http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/this-honey-harvesting-video-is.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/this-honey-harvesting-video-is.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:41:32 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737227 Enjoy this hypnotic video of a honey harvest in the desert.

IMGURian JohnDeCaux shares some wonderful DIY beekeeping footage documenting his dad's honey harvesting process.

“To harvest honey, the wax cappings are removed with a honey paw before the honeycomb is placed in the extractor.

“The honeycomb is then placed in revolving baskets where the spinning movement throws out the honey by centrifugal force.”

“Little or no damage is done to the delicate honeycomb by this process, and when it is returned to the hive, the bees immediately set about removing any leftover honey plus repairing and polishing each cell in readiness for a new load of honey.”

Watch this wonderful video that shows a Red Gum tree honey harvest from start to finish, from the web series John DeCaux and his dad Mark make about DIY beekeeping.

You can buy the honey!

You can follow them on YouTube for more cool wild beekeeping videos.

Buy the honey here. They also have a Patreon.

Read the rest

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Enjoy this hypnotic video of a honey harvest in the desert.

IMGURian JohnDeCaux shares some wonderful DIY beekeeping footage documenting his dad's honey harvesting process.

“To harvest honey, the wax cappings are removed with a honey paw before the honeycomb is placed in the extractor.

“The honeycomb is then placed in revolving baskets where the spinning movement throws out the honey by centrifugal force.”

“Little or no damage is done to the delicate honeycomb by this process, and when it is returned to the hive, the bees immediately set about removing any leftover honey plus repairing and polishing each cell in readiness for a new load of honey.”

Watch this wonderful video that shows a Red Gum tree honey harvest from start to finish, from the web series John DeCaux and his dad Mark make about DIY beekeeping.

You can buy the honey!

You can follow them on YouTube for more cool wild beekeeping videos.

Buy the honey here. They also have a Patreon.

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Toddlers are overjoyed to spot each other on the street and give an awesome hug http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/toddlers-are-overjoyed-to-spot.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/toddlers-are-overjoyed-to-spot.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 16:22:20 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737221 Maxwell and Finnegan are besties, so when they spot each other on the street, it's sheer exuberance. They've only known each other for a year, but in toddler years that's half a lifetime. Pure joy.

Click here to see the video.

Via ABC News

Image and video: eternalrefuge86/Reddit Read the rest

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Maxwell and Finnegan are besties, so when they spot each other on the street, it's sheer exuberance. They've only known each other for a year, but in toddler years that's half a lifetime. Pure joy.

Click here to see the video.

Via ABC News

Image and video: eternalrefuge86/Reddit

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Dog shows us just how great home grown tomatoes taste http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/dog-shows-us-just-how-great-ho.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/dog-shows-us-just-how-great-ho.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:52:21 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737211

my dad sent me this vid of the dog picking and eating a tomato from the garden pic.twitter.com/L6q69fXdcm

— jenny (@fvrmvn) September 8, 2019

So much better than supermarket tomatoes. Read the rest

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my dad sent me this vid of the dog picking and eating a tomato from the garden pic.twitter.com/L6q69fXdcm

— jenny (@fvrmvn) September 8, 2019

So much better than supermarket tomatoes.

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I am guessing this awesome chair was at a festival in the desert http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/i-am-guessing-this-awesome-cha.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/i-am-guessing-this-awesome-cha.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 15:40:02 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737206

This chair pic.twitter.com/iXoRpVUS99

— Steampunk Tendencies (@Steampunk_T) September 5, 2019

Very cool! Read the rest

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This chair pic.twitter.com/iXoRpVUS99

— Steampunk Tendencies (@Steampunk_T) September 5, 2019

Very cool!

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The greatest looping yoyo http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/the-greatest-looping-yoyo.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/the-greatest-looping-yoyo.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 14:46:23 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737192

YoYo Factory's Loop 2020 is their top of the line competiton looping yoyo.

YoYoFactory already made a really fantastic looping yoyo, the Loop 1080, before they partnered with the world champion, Shu Takada, to make one even better. This super customizable looper sports an interchangeable axel, spacers and response system. You can swap starbursts out for different types!

I love this yo-yo but will be back to my Duncan Imperial when a daughter or niece swipes this one and loses all the parts.

Here is how the world champion sets one up!

While I have long held a preference for string-trick yo-yos like the Duncan Butterfly, I have been playing with loopers lately.

YoYoFactory Loop 2020 Yo-Yo - Looping System - Shu Takada YoYo (Orange) via Amazon Read the rest

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YoYo Factory's Loop 2020 is their top of the line competiton looping yoyo.

YoYoFactory already made a really fantastic looping yoyo, the Loop 1080, before they partnered with the world champion, Shu Takada, to make one even better. This super customizable looper sports an interchangeable axel, spacers and response system. You can swap starbursts out for different types!

I love this yo-yo but will be back to my Duncan Imperial when a daughter or niece swipes this one and loses all the parts.

Here is how the world champion sets one up!

While I have long held a preference for string-trick yo-yos like the Duncan Butterfly, I have been playing with loopers lately.

YoYoFactory Loop 2020 Yo-Yo - Looping System - Shu Takada YoYo (Orange) via Amazon

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Mini documentary about how Jamal Khashoggi was murdered http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/mini-documentary-about-how-jam.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/mini-documentary-about-how-jam.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 14:39:14 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737193

Washington Post columnist and Saudi Arabian dissident Jamal Khashoggi was murdered and dismembered by agents of the Saudi royal family at the country's embassy in Turkey. This video reconstruction by Al Jazeera shows the last minutes of his life and the first minutes of his death. It's based on transcripts and timestamps from surveillance recordings, as released by the Turkish government and published by Daily Sabah.

The video appears to skip over stuff, though, implying that he was suffocated with a hood when there is apparently some debate over whether he was dead or merely drugged before the dismembering began. More details in print.

Audio recordings of the horrifying conversations between the 15-man Saudi hit squad and their victim, journalist Jamal Khashoggi, has been revealed to the public for the first time by the Turkish daily Sabah.....

Mutreb: Is it possible to put the body in a bag?

Al-Tubaigy: No. Too heavy, very tall too. Actually, I've always worked on cadavers. I know how to cut very well. I have never worked on a warm body though, but I'll also manage that easily. I normally put on my earphones and listen to music when I cut cadavers. In the meantime, I sip on my coffee and smoke. After I dismember it, you will wrap the parts into plastic bags, put them in suitcases and take them out (of the building).

Read the rest ]]>

Washington Post columnist and Saudi Arabian dissident Jamal Khashoggi was murdered and dismembered by agents of the Saudi royal family at the country's embassy in Turkey. This video reconstruction by Al Jazeera shows the last minutes of his life and the first minutes of his death. It's based on transcripts and timestamps from surveillance recordings, as released by the Turkish government and published by Daily Sabah.

The video appears to skip over stuff, though, implying that he was suffocated with a hood when there is apparently some debate over whether he was dead or merely drugged before the dismembering began. More details in print.

Audio recordings of the horrifying conversations between the 15-man Saudi hit squad and their victim, journalist Jamal Khashoggi, has been revealed to the public for the first time by the Turkish daily Sabah.....

Mutreb: Is it possible to put the body in a bag?

Al-Tubaigy: No. Too heavy, very tall too. Actually, I've always worked on cadavers. I know how to cut very well. I have never worked on a warm body though, but I'll also manage that easily. I normally put on my earphones and listen to music when I cut cadavers. In the meantime, I sip on my coffee and smoke. After I dismember it, you will wrap the parts into plastic bags, put them in suitcases and take them out (of the building).

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Why else would a grown man play with trains? http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/why-else-would-a-grown-man-pla.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/why-else-would-a-grown-man-pla.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 14:09:21 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737188

Tish! Would you like to see me blow up three trains?! Read the rest

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Tish! Would you like to see me blow up three trains?!

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UK awards knighthood to girlfriend-beating cricketer who complained he'd have to black up to get the honor http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/uk-to-knight-girlfriend-beatin.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/uk-to-knight-girlfriend-beatin.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 13:57:09 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737174 Geoffrey Boycott was once a famous sportsman, but is now a domestic abuser convicted of beating up his girlfriend in a French hotel and leaving her to pay the bill. He's being knighted.

Boycott was fined £5,000 and given a three-month suspended sentence in 1998 after being convicted of beating his then-girlfriend Margaret Moore in a French Riviera hotel. ...

Asked about the criticism from Women's Aid by presenter Martha Kearney on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Boycott responded: "I don't give a toss about her, love. It was 25 years ago so you can take your political nature and do whatever you want with it."

From the BBC's original story about his conviction and failed appeal, in 1998:

During the trial, the court was told that Boycott pinned Miss Moore down and punched her 20 times in the face before checking out and leaving her to pay the bill.

Margaret Moore said she was punched in the face 20 times Boycott denied the allegations, saying 45-year-old Miss Moore had slipped after flying into a rage when he refused to marry her.

He said he had decided to leave the hotel after "becoming sick and tired of telling her that I am not going to [marry her], I am not the marrying kind".

Bear in mind that he was convicted in a French court decades ago; just last week, the New York Times reported on France's failed attempts to "Get Serious About Domestic Violence" in 2019. His behavior was egregious by such standards. Read the rest

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Geoffrey Boycott was once a famous sportsman, but is now a domestic abuser convicted of beating up his girlfriend in a French hotel and leaving her to pay the bill. He's being knighted.

Boycott was fined £5,000 and given a three-month suspended sentence in 1998 after being convicted of beating his then-girlfriend Margaret Moore in a French Riviera hotel. ...

Asked about the criticism from Women's Aid by presenter Martha Kearney on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Boycott responded: "I don't give a toss about her, love. It was 25 years ago so you can take your political nature and do whatever you want with it."

From the BBC's original story about his conviction and failed appeal, in 1998:

During the trial, the court was told that Boycott pinned Miss Moore down and punched her 20 times in the face before checking out and leaving her to pay the bill.

Margaret Moore said she was punched in the face 20 times
Boycott denied the allegations, saying 45-year-old Miss Moore had slipped after flying into a rage when he refused to marry her.

He said he had decided to leave the hotel after "becoming sick and tired of telling her that I am not going to [marry her], I am not the marrying kind".

Bear in mind that he was convicted in a French court decades ago; just last week, the New York Times reported on France's failed attempts to "Get Serious About Domestic Violence" in 2019. His behavior was egregious by such standards.

Boycott has complained about not being knighted earlier, offering interesting remarks about black cricketers who have been.

Speaking to VIP guests at a Q&A session which cost £300 a ticket, the 76-year-old said knighthoods were handed out like “confetti” to West Indies greats.

The BBC pundit told Sky Sports presenter Gary Newbon: “Mine’s been turned down twice. I’d better black me face.”

The audience reportedly reacted with “uneasy silence” at the luxury hospitality event.

Even the right-wing Sunday Express, a tabloid whose logo is a crusader with an English flag shield, described this as a "racist tirade."

His employer, the BBC, was fine with it, obviously.

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Why haven't cyberinsurers exerted more pressure on companies to be better at security? http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/externalized-risk.html http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/externalized-risk.html#comments Tue, 10 Sep 2019 13:52:37 +0000 http://www.9488038.com/?p=737180 For decades, people (including me) have predicted that cyberinsurers might be a way to get companies to take security seriously. After all, insurers have to live in the real world (which is why terrorism insurance is cheap, because terrorism is not a meaningful risk in America), and in the real world, poor security practices destroy peoples' lives, all the time, in wholesale quantities that beggar the imagination.

But the empirical data shows that insurers routinely write policies for companies that do incredibly stupid shit, and don't offer meaningful discounts to companies that have good security policies (you don't even have to keep your patchlevel current to maintain your insurance!). Instead, insurers focus on "post-breach services" that help companies get back to work after the breaches have taken place.

In a forthcoming paper in IEEE Privacy and Security, two computer scientists (Oxford U, U of Tulsa) investigate this question, documenting the dismal state of insurers' requirements for cyberinsurance, and the ease of making claims, even for incidents that were utterly preventable.

One possibility that the authors don't delve into: cyberinsurance is cheap because the penalties for breaches are laughably light. While it's true that some incidents (e.g. ransomware) have a direct operational cost to the company, the vast majority of incidents involve data-breaches that affect the company's customers or stakeholders.

The lack of a statutory damages regime for breaches means that customers whose data is compromised have to produce receipts for the harms they've suffered before a judge, and since it's hard to quantify those damages (many of them may not be incurred for years to come), which is why Home Depot paid literal pennies to settle claims when it lost 50,000,000 customers' data. Read the rest

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For decades, people (including me) have predicted that cyberinsurers might be a way to get companies to take security seriously. After all, insurers have to live in the real world (which is why terrorism insurance is cheap, because terrorism is not a meaningful risk in America), and in the real world, poor security practices destroy peoples' lives, all the time, in wholesale quantities that beggar the imagination.

But the empirical data shows that insurers routinely write policies for companies that do incredibly stupid shit, and don't offer meaningful discounts to companies that have good security policies (you don't even have to keep your patchlevel current to maintain your insurance!). Instead, insurers focus on "post-breach services" that help companies get back to work after the breaches have taken place.

In a forthcoming paper in IEEE Privacy and Security, two computer scientists (Oxford U, U of Tulsa) investigate this question, documenting the dismal state of insurers' requirements for cyberinsurance, and the ease of making claims, even for incidents that were utterly preventable.

One possibility that the authors don't delve into: cyberinsurance is cheap because the penalties for breaches are laughably light. While it's true that some incidents (e.g. ransomware) have a direct operational cost to the company, the vast majority of incidents involve data-breaches that affect the company's customers or stakeholders.

The lack of a statutory damages regime for breaches means that customers whose data is compromised have to produce receipts for the harms they've suffered before a judge, and since it's hard to quantify those damages (many of them may not be incurred for years to come), which is why Home Depot paid literal pennies to settle claims when it lost 50,000,000 customers' data.

And since all companies mishandle user data, and since it's impossible to tell a company with responsible IT practices from a reckless one until it's too late, we have a Market for Lemons in security.

It seems to me that if you want insurers to put more constraints on the reckless conduct of their customers, you could increase the consequences of failing to do so: if companies had to pay statutory damages to people whose data they lost, insurers would either exclude those losses, impose a system of rigorous security measures and audits, or charge so much more for insurance that companies couldn't afford it, leaving their directors and officers exposed to liability. A couple of high-profile bankruptcies from board members who lost their shirts in lawsuits over company security breaches would certainly get the attention of corporate boards.

Policy makers have long held high hopes for cyber insurance as a tool for improving security. Unfortunately, the available evidence so far should give policymakers pause. Cyber insurance appears to be a weak form of governanceat present. Insurers writing cyber insurance focus more on organisational procedures than technical controls, rarely include basic security procedures in contracts, and offer discounts that only offer a marginal incentive to in-vest in security. However, the cost of external response services is covered, which suggests insurers believe ex-post responses to be more effective than ex-ante mitigation. (Alternatively, they can more easily translate the costs associated with ex-post responses into manageable claims.)

The private governance role of cyber insurance is limited by market dynamics. Competitive pressures drive a race-to-the-bottom in risk assessment standards and prevent insurers including security procedures in contracts. Policy interventions, such as minimum risk assessment standards, could solve this collective action problem. Policy-holders and brokers could also drive this change by looking to insurers who conduct rigorous assessments. Doing otherwise ensures adverse selection and moral hazard will increase costs for firms with responsible security postures. Moving toward standardised risk assessment via proposal forms or external scans supports the actuarial base in the long-term. But there is a danger policyholders will succumb to Goodhart's law by internalising these metrics and optimising the metric rather than minimising risk. This is particularly likely given these assessments are constructed by private actors with their own incentives. Search-light effects may drive the scores towards being based on what can be measured, not what is important.

Systemic risk has a number of possible futures. Organisations may have to accept liability as insurers exclude the risk. Governments might step in to offer re-insurance, though we caution against doing so until an under-sup-ply of cyber insurance is observed. Or insurers might show leadership in encouraging diversity in technology and service provision to reduce systemic risk.

Does insurance have a future in governing cybersecurity? [Daniel W. Woods and Tyler Moore/IEEE Privacy and Security]

(via Schneier) ]]> http://www.9488038.com/2019/09/10/externalized-risk.html/feed 8 737180 皇冠时时彩平台出租

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