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      "Strarcrossed," the hot disco track from the Price is Right (1976)

      Come on down and, more to the point, get on down to this full version of "Starcrossed," one of the many disco jams from Score Productions used as a musical cue on The Price is Right starting in 1976.

      Also, I hadn't realized before that Crystal Waters' 2001 cover of Score Productions' "Come on Down," aka the main Price is Right theme, hit number one on Billboard's Dance Club Songs Chart! I much prefer the original lyric-less version. Both are below.

      Read the rest

      Watch clips from Breathe, a lovely "water opera" in a pool

      A few weeks ago at Appleton, Wisconsin's Lawrence University, a group of experimental musicians, dancers, and performance artists staged "Breathe," a "multidisicplinary water opera" in the college's swimming pool. (The video above is from a previous performance at Middlebury College's Natatorium). From Fox Cities Magazine:

      Lawrence University’s Margaret Sunghe Paek, professor of dance and curator of Dance Series, will work with music director Loren Dempster and director/choreographer Gabriel Forestieri to bring (the performance) to life...

      “I wanted to see if I could make sound underwater,” Dempster says. “I experimented with microphones underwater, I bought a hydrophone, I [even] played the cello underwater.”

      Dempster will be the only underwater musician in the entire opera as he will be in the shallow end, playing his cello while underwater microphones transmit the sounds above the surface.

      Forestieri choreographed the opera, combining the practice of dance and free diving, called dancing in apnea, to create the water visuals.

      “[I’m] taking cues from the space and the people in the space and how they relate to each other,” Forestieri says. “The choreography is a mix of [dancing] on deck, sometimes in the pool, partner dancing in the shallow end, and dancers floating with float belt.”

      (via Weird Universe)

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      Banjo Guy Ollie covers the Shadow of the Beast exploration theme

      Banjo Guy Ollie's cover of the Shadow of the Beast theme tune is perfect. Composed by David Whittaker for the 1989 Commodore Amiga game, most covers of it are bad because modern synths and DAWs offer high-quality but uncannily electronic flutes, whereas the original's texture depended on a rough simplicity imposed by technical limitations. Most covers take on a slick "Pure Moods Vol. XIII" vibe at odds with the original's low-fi mix of disco and world music (cf. the so-called "ethnic electronica" that would emerge in the 1990s). Ollie not only nails it on its own terms, but transposes it to his own musical language. Now, do the whole OST!

      Go to Ollie's Patreon and give him your money. Read the rest

      Watch Madonna, at age 16, star in a high-schooler's experimental film

      In 1974, Wyn Cooper, one of Madonna's fellow students at Adams High School near Detroit, invited the 16-year-old pre-material girl to star in his experimental film. The Super 8 short is titled "The Egg." "We developed a friendship and hung out," Cooper, now a poet in Vermont, has said. "I had a Mercury Capri with an eight-track tape player. Madonna and I would hop in the car, drive around and listen to Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders From Mars while enjoying a little marijuana." (via r/ObscureMedia) Read the rest

      Oddly familiar video game tunes

      Did you know that Ken's theme from Street Fighter II is a bit infringey-whingey when it comes to a Cheap Trick song from the Top Gun soundtrack? Somehow I went for decades without noticing this—or any of the other infringey-whingey examples offered in this set of "Video game themes that sound familiar." Granted, not all of them are quite so cut and dry as the Capcom lift.

      Many of the soundalikes emerge from a very specific period in the early 1990s. It might just be the stuff that the video's creator grew up with, but the earlier examples tend to be straightforward covers (such as Spy Hunter's 1983 rendition of Henry Mancini) while later ones are more lawyered (sticking the intrumentation and beat but changing melodies). There was a magic point where they were still making ephemeral kids' entertainment, yet making it very well, but before they realized that it wasn't so ephemeral.

      Embedded below is one that's not in the video: Friendship's Let's Not Talk About It (1979). I won't name the culprit, but I guarantee you'll know the lift when you hear it.

      Read the rest

      Seattle mainstay musician Shawn Smith of Brad, Satchel, and Pigeonhed, RIP

      Shawn Smith, the soulful singer who was a legend in the Seattle music scene, died yesterday at age 53. I first encountered Shawn's voice in the early-1990s by way of Greg Dulli's bands the Afghan Whigs and Twilight Singers. But Smith's influence on the Seattle music scene, and rock in general, dates back to the mid-1980s when he was part of the tight-knit community of musicians that birthed Mother Love Bone, Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden.

      Eerily, April 5 was the anniversary of the deaths of Seattle singers Kurt Cobain (Nirvana) and Layne Staley (Alice in Chains).

      My condolences to Smith's son, family, friends, and the Seattle music community that adored him. From the Seattle Times:

      In recent weeks, Smith was working on a new album with the band Brad, which he founded in 1992 with Pearl Jam guitarist Stone Gossard, drummer Regan Hagar and bassist Jeremy Toback. They were recording at Studio Litho, owned by Gossard.

      Born in Spokane, Smith came to Seattle in 1987, and formed a band called Malfunkshun with Hagar and Kevin and Andrew Wood (who would go on to form Mother Love Bone with Gossard and bassist Jeff Ament).

      In 1992, he released his first solo album under the name Pigeonhed. That same year, Brad released its first album, “Shame” in 1993. The band would put out four albums, including “Interiors,” which features one of Smith’s best-known songs, “The Day Brings.”

      He made two records with the band Satchel, and appeared on The Afghan Whigs’ album “Black Love,” as well as Whigs founder Greg Dulli’s solo album.

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      The Internet Archive has recovered 500,000+ of the 50,000,000 songs Myspace "accidentally" deleted during a server migration

      Last month, Myspace sheepishly admitted that it had "accidentally" deleted 12 years' worth of its users' music during a server migration; now the Internet Archive has revealed that they were able to preserve two years' worth of that music, 50,000 tracks from 2008-2010, downloaded by an anonymous group of academics for research purposes. Read the rest

      Death metal flautist

      Behold the music of Lombolo (Spotify); the song is titled B?rs?rkag?ng and features an unusual combination of death metal and folk flute. [via]

      I used to make death metal, but after feeling stuck in a rut, I started a band with my flutist friend, making metal mixed with Scandinavian folk music. This is our first song.

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      Elton John explains Tiny Dancer as he plays it for a TV crew in 1971

      Elton John, then around 23, takes a TV crew through the structure of "Tiny Dancer," a song with lyrics written by John's longtime writing partner Bernie Taupin about his girlfriend (later wife) Maxine Feibelman who at the time was the Elton John Band's seamstress.

      (via Laughing Squid) Read the rest

      Trailer for new documentary about the 60s-70s Laurel Canyon music scene featuring Tom Petty, Cat Power, Jackson Browne, Norah Jones

      In the 1960s and 1970s, Los Angeles's Laurel Canyon neighborhood was flowing with sex, drugs, and folk-rock and roll. Joni Mitchell, the Byrds, Jackson Brown, Carole King, the Mamas & The Papas, and countless other musicians made the scene or had homes in the hills. Echo in the Canyon is a new documentary about that magical moment and the influential sound that emerged. The trip back in time to this "legendary paradise, as Tom Petty called it, was directed by Andrew Slater with Jakob Dylan as executive producer.

      “The best test of songwriting is that it transcends its moment in time,” Dylan said in a statement. “And there is no doubt that the songs we explore in this film are as powerful today as they were in 1965.”

      Echo in the Canyon will see a national release in June.

      (Rolling Stone) Read the rest

      Watch The Cure's Robert Smith brilliant start to a red carpet interview

      The inimitable Robert Smith on the red carpet following The Cure's induction last week into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

      Here's their performance:

      Read the rest

      Skrillex song messes up mosquitos' attacks and mating according to scientific study

      A new study reveals that the Skrillex track "Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites" reduces mosquitos' success in foraging, host attack, and sexual activities of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that spreads dengue fever, chikungunya, Zika fever, Mayaro, and other nasty diseases. According to the researchers from the Universiti Malaysia Sarawak and their colleagues, it's all about that bass. From their scientific paper published in the journal Acta Tropica:

      Sound and its reception are crucial for reproduction, survival, and population maintenance of many animals. In insects, low-frequency vibrations facilitate sexual interactions, whereas noise disrupts the perception of signals from conspecifics and hosts. Despite evidence that mosquitoes respond to sound frequencies beyond fundamental ranges, including songs, and that males and females need to struggle to harmonize their flight tones, the behavioral impacts of music as control targets remain unexplored. In this study, we examined the effects of electronic music (Scary Monsters and Nice Sprites by Skrillex) on foraging, host attack, and sexual activities of the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. Adults were presented with two sound environments (music-off or music-on). Discrepancies in visitation, blood feeding, and copulation patterns were compared between environments with and without music. Ae. aegypti females maintained in the music-off environment initiated host visits earlier than those in the music-on environment. They visited the host significantly less often in the music-on than the music-off condition. Females exposed to music attacked hosts much later than their non-exposed peers. The occurrence of blood feeding activity was lower when music was being played. Adults exposed to music copulated far less often than their counterparts kept in an environment where there was no music.

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      Listen to David Bowie hear a touching birthday message from Scott Walker

      On January 8, 1997, David Bowie became quite emotional after hearing happy birthday message from the pioneering pop/experimental musician Scott Walker, who died yesterday. It was a touching moment then and even moreso now that both of these inimitable forces of avant-garde art/music are gone. Turns out that Walker's birthday was the following day:

      "I'll have a drink to you on the other side of midnight. How's that?"

      Read the rest

      Lead Belly sings about Mr. Hitler (1942)

      My favorite blues singer Huddie William Ledbetter (1888-1949), aka Lead Belly, sung about traditional blues topics like relationships, prison, and poverty, but he also wrote about current events and newsmakers of the day, from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Jean Harlow to the Scottsboro Boys. In 1942, Lead Belly wrote this tune, "Mr. Hitler." Here are the lyrics:

      Hiltler started out in 1932 Hiltler started out in 1932 When he started out, he took the homes from the Jews

      We're gonna tear Hitler down We're gonna tear Hitler down We're gonna tear Hitler down someday. We're gonna bring him to the ground We're gonna bring him to the ground We're gonna bring him to the ground someday.

      When Hitler started out, he took the Jews from their homes When Hitler started out, he took the Jews from their homes That's one thing Mr. Hitler you know you done wrong.

      We're gonna tear Hitler down We're gonna tear Hitler down We're gonna tear Hitler down someday. We're gonna bring him to the ground We're gonna bring him to the ground We're gonna bring him to the ground someday.

      You ain't no iron, you ain't no solid rock You ain't no iron, you ain't no solid rock but we American people say "Mr. Hitler you is got to stop!"

      We're gonna tear Hitler down We're gonna tear Hitler down We're gonna tear Hitler down someday. We're gonna bring him to the ground We're gonna bring him to the ground We're gonna bring him to the ground someday.

      Read the rest

      Scott Walker, pioneering art rock singer, RIP

      Legendary singer Scott Walker, whose journey as a musician took him from blue-eyed soul to baroque pop to heady avant-garde experimentalism, has died at age 76. Walker counted the likes of Radiohead, Pulp, Julian Cope, and Sunn O))) as fans and collaborators. From an obituary released by Walker's record label 4AD:

      Noel Scott Engel (later known as Scott Walker) was born in 1943, the son of an Ohio geologist. He began his career as a session bassist, changing his name when he joined The Walker Brothers. The 1960s trio enjoyed a meteoric rise, especially in Britain, where hits like 'The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore’ attracted a following to rival that of The Beatles.

      But the superstar lifestyle and fame was not for Scott. As an only child, he had grown up in the kind of rich, slow solitude in which imagination could flourish, and he retreated from the limelight, returning as a solo artist to release a string of critically acclaimed albums, Scott, Scott 2, Scott 3 and Scott 4. He disappeared until the late 1970’s, when The Walker Brothers re-joined for their last album together and then a solo album in the 80’s.

      Another long silence and Scott then re-emerged in the 90’s and onwards with lyric-driven works that deconstructed music into elemental soundscapes. Drawing on politics, war, plague, torture, and industrial harshness, Scott’s apocalyptic epics used silence as well as real-world effects and pared-back vocals to articulate the void. Sometimes gothic and eerie, often sweepingly cinematic, always strikingly visual, his works reached for the inexpressible, emerging from space as yearnings in texture and dissonance.

      Read the rest

      Hello World

      Enjoy Louie Zong's sweet song, just perfect to start the week with. Zong used a 2006 app called Virtual Singer. Read the rest

      Robocopyright: Dan Bull's rap anthem for the defeat of #Article13

      Just in time for a continent-wide day of street demonstrations against Article 13 and the new Copyright Directive, British rapper Dan Bull (previously) has released a furious, amazing new song about the regulation: Robocopyright. More than a 100 MEPs have pledged to vote against the measure on Monday, and it's not too late for you to contact your MEP and tell them that you expect them to vote to defeat it. Read the rest

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      皇冠时时彩平台出租
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